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Today I learned ...
Posted: Posted November 27th, 2018 by chiarizio

Today I learned that new species can become established in a matter of centuries.
There are several related species of mouse on some island who evolved in 600 years, about.
There is a species of mosquito in the London Underground that have evolved in 150 years.

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The thing that can really speed up evolution is a genome-doubling event, or something similar if the population has already undergone a genome-doubling event.
Partial aneuploidies, in which only some chromosomes occur in increased or decreased numbers, tend to be highly disadvantageous. Whole-genome-doubling events are much less likely; but also less likely to be detrimental —— or likely to be less detrimental — if they do occur.

Then if one of a duplicated chromosome mutates, there’s probably still an unmutated version still doing its old job the old way. That makes mutations less likely to be fatal.

——

The real creator of speciation is (I think) splitting the population into two or more groups who will then be isolated from each other. Usually the splitting and isolation are geographic; but it could be something else.

There are 6 Replies

Today I learned about the marriage and kinship and residency systems of the Rukuba tribe in Nigeria. Very interesting. The customs regarding second marriages are fascinating!

Edit:
https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rukuba

Posted December 11th, 2018 by chiarizio

bump, maybe?

Posted December 16th, 2018 by chiarizio

Today I learned, from the Scientific American I just found in my mailbox, that:
The Tower* Black Raven prefers kipping on her back! ** She’s not dead, she’s restin’!
(And her name is Merlina. She’s one of seven.)

*of London
  • from about 1:35 to about 1:45

  • Posted December 22nd, 2018 by chiarizio

    Today I learned about Irigwe 2ndary marriage, and how it compares and contrasts with Rukuba secondary marriage.

    https://urresearch.rochester.edu/fileDownloadForInstitutionalItem.action?itemId=6541&itemFileId=10621

    Both cultures are patrilineal and patrilocal and virilocal; yet the Rukuba very much emphasize female choice, while among the Irigwe a woman’s entire marital career is governed by her father or a “father-at-hand” (“official” father-surrogate).

    Posted December 31st, 2018 by chiarizio

    Today I learned that new species can become established in a matter of centuries.
    There are several related species of mouse on some island who evolved in 600 years, about.


    I didn't think it would be that quick!

    Are they like dog~wolf (practically speaking species because of population separation but can interbreed) or human~bonobo (different species because even if they do tango, no offspring are made)?

    There is a species of mosquito in the London Underground that have evolved in 150 years.


    Interesting. I've read that mosquitoes can reproduce at a rate of ten generations in a year. Maybe a little less in the cool dank of the London Underground? (Or maybe more now that they're evolving to their niche!)

    That's about equivalent to 30,000 years of human activity. I don't think it will be possible for us to speciate, barring some massive cataclysm. But it is fascinating that these little critters are doing so all over the place!



    Microspecies.

    Ain't evilution wonderful!? :twisted:

    The real creator of speciation is (I think) splitting the population into two or more groups who will then be isolated from each other. Usually the splitting and isolation are geographic; but it could be something else.


    I think this is the classic example. Galapagos Island proliferation. European pygmy hippos, etc.

    The mosquitoes you mention would certainly count as isolated, but possibly still admitting of some random (train delivered) new blood.

    One wonders how many microspecies of rodents and insects there may actually be. Not just in subway tunnels, but in well established environments like old apartment complexes, hospitals, markets, sporting & entertainment venues and the like. Deep in the sub-basements of old Chicago or NYC buildings, there could be dozens or hundreds of mouse & cockroach microspecies!

    :shock:

    Posted January 8th by elemtilas

    One wonders how many microspecies of rodents and insects there may actually be.


    Well, I wasn’t before, but I am now!

    Posted January 8th by chiarizio
    Reply to: Today I learned ...
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