Warning: mysqli_fetch_row() expects parameter 1 to be mysqli_result, boolean given in /var/www/html/gtx0.com/core.php on line 94
Names names names... - Gtx0 ?>


Names names names...
Posted: Posted September 1st, 2009 by Lyndon
View Source Report Thread Views

How are people named in your conworld?
Are they named after what they do? Who their family are?

Basically, are their names:
based on their family name (if so where'd the original name come from)
chosen by their parents/guardians/whoever
chosen by themselves (perhaps at a coming of age ceremony)
awarded/earned by those around them
or anything else

For example in RL most people are named after their parents (surname) and also have a name chosen by them (forename).

(I haven't posted in quite a while so forgive me if this seems like an odd question)

There are 9 Replies

My conworld is an infinite multiverse. There are a lot of different naming conventions in there.

For Example:

Néjadish names (at least from the current era of the most prominent incarnation of Néjadish culture) are formed with Clan name first, Patronym/Matronym next, then a class/caste/job-related name, then one or more personal names.

Posted September 1st, 2009 by jseamus
View Source Quote Report
jseamus
 

How are people named in your conworld?
Are they named after what they do? Who their family are?

Basically, are their names:
based on their family name (if so where'd the original name come from)
chosen by their parents/guardians/whoever
chosen by themselves (perhaps at a coming of age ceremony)
awarded/earned by those around them
or anything else

For example in RL most people are named after their parents (surname) and also have a name chosen by them (forename).
I'm pretty sure I've posted about this before.
In Adpihi all of those are used; an Adpihi might have fifteen names, though for the most part only four are used most of the time.
based on their family name
There are three "family names"; the patriline name, the matriline name, and the "rope" name. Everyone has the same patriline name as their father; everyone has the same matriline name as their mother; and everyone has the same "rope" name as the parent of the opposite sex.
(if so where'd the original name come from)
I don't think anyone honestly knows, though several people have ideas.
chosen by their parents/guardians/whoever
At birth/baptism/christening every child is given a name by each godparent. The name a boy's father's mother gives him, or the name a girl's mother's father gives her, are the ones they mostly "go by" until they come of age.
Not all of this is completely free; one of the "forenames" a boy is given is that of the closest deceased male relative of one of his parents that he doesn't already have an older brother named for; similarly, one of the "forenames" a girl is given is that of the closest deceased female relative of one of her parents that she doesn't already have an older sister named for.
For brothers, the relative in question rotates among relatives of their grandparents as follows;
father's father or his closest deceased male relative
mother's father or his closest deceased male relative
father's mother's closest deceased male relative
mother's mother's closest deceased male relative
repeat as often as necessary.

For sisters, the relative in question rotates among relatives of their grandparents as follows;
mother's mother or her closest deceased female relative
father's mother or her closest deceased female relative
mother's father's closest deceased female relative
father's father's closest deceased female relative
repeat as often as necessary.

(Since people seldom have more than six or seven children, and it's rare that they'd all be sons or all be daughters, the tradition goes out to about nine names for each sex; after which people get sort of vague.)

If you know an individual's family names, her/his parents' family names, and her/his grandparents' family names, you can take a good guess about what generation of each of his/her families s/he belongs to. But just in case, each family has a cycle of four to eleven "fore"names that they rotate among.

If you know his/her forenames, and those of his parents and of their parents and siblings, you can generally take a good guess where s/he is in the birth-order of his/her siblings. But just in case one of their "fore"names actually says something like "couple's first son, couple's second child, father's second son, father's third child, mother's first son, mother's third child" or whatever the combination is.

chosen by themselves (perhaps at a coming of age ceremony)
awarded/earned by those around them
These tend to be sort of the same thing. A person may also acquire a new name at marriage, and/or at the birth of his/her first child, and/or at the death of one or both of his/her parents and/or (one of) his/her spouse(s), and or upon entering a profession (including joining a laborunion or taking religious orders or joining a military service), and/or successfully completing a long and hard course of study (such as getting a master's or doctorate or postdoc or habilitationsschrift, or a baccelaureate or some other "graduation"), or getting a knighthood or a title of nobility, etc.

They also have a "fore"name that tells something about the time they were born; say, what year in the 57-year cycle, and/or what month in the 705-month cycle.

Certain legal documents, such as marriage licenses, birth certificates, wills, and deeds, require a person's full name. That shows which patrilines, matrilines, and "ropes" s/he, his/her parents, and his/her grandparents belong to; what generation of each of his/her patriline, matriline, and "rope" s/he belongs to; where s/he fit in the birth-order; his/her birthdate; where s/he was born; his/her profession; his/her degrees, titles, etc.; and a whole bunch of "forenames".

Usually, though, just one of those, plus the name of his/her patriline, matriline, and "rope", are enough to distinguish him/her for most purposes, there usually not being anyone with the same combination who is anywhere near as likely to be meant instead. In fact, in some circumstances just one, or in some two, or in some three, are often sufficient.

Posted September 1st, 2009 by chiarizio
View Source Quote Report

I don't have much that's really polished beyond these two.

Cerelians:
First names rage from two syllables for males, to three syllables for females, typically with sharp syllabic transitions, female names almost exclusively ending in vowels and male names exclusively in consonents. Surnames tend to be terse, one or two syllable sounds that rely on multiple blended consonents and few vowels. Surnames also bear one or more prefixes dictated by the branch of society where the individual is assigned to work upon birth. This is intended to remind each citizen born in Cerelios that their duty to their nation comes before even family, and that it is an intrinsic part of who they were meant to be.
Common Female Names: Alifa, Desiri, Fenaghi, Hilara, Jessara, Mareha, Peyara, Rashifa, Sinafi, Taleja
Common Male Names: Amir, Bilal, Gelel, Heshan, Jafryte, Markul, Phelir, Ramxis, Reshid, Zahim
Prefixes: abd- (executives), alu- (military), il- (maintenance), jafd- (public service), mat- (entertainers), phe- (overseers), rabd- (machine operators)
Common Surnames: Abdur, Chezur, Farphim, Jessud, Jikram, Kapham, Maphrum, Razhul, Tehlur, Zehid


Xandrenians:
Xandrenian names are composed of two names, a first name, which the individual is most commonly known by, and a clan name, which designates which Childkeeper home they were raised in. Females tend to be given names that are breathy and soft, with syllables that roll together rather than stand distinct. Males are given simple names with distinct divisions that often seem more like guttural sounds that could be uttered at any time. The clan name is always that of the family of Childkeeper, of which there are fifteen on the island, and signifies only where they were born and raised. Clan names are composed of an initial letter or sound, denoting the city, followed by the surname of the fey. Of the fifteen clans, D'sirloth, Q'lethel, and V'suul are the most prestigious, renowned for their exceptional results.
Clan Names: A'morl, A'suudi, A'zreth (Jarthul); D'morl, D'sirloth, D'zareth (Xandren City); Q'lethel, Q'narath, Q'garem (Ferlorel); Th'ilmar, Th'lyar, Th'trooth (Cummatra); V'narmeth, V'suul, V'zhan (Enthame)


The Kaelonir have around sixty surnames, including about a dozen or so dead names, as their surnames are given based on which Blade Spirit they inherit. The dead names belonged to Blade Spirits that have either disappeared or been intentionally destroyed for crimes against their own people (the bad thing about inherited, multifaceted spirits is that most of their facets tend to be the same).

But other than those, nothing too special or noteworthy at the moment.

Posted September 2nd, 2009 by Tharivious
View Source Quote Report

Malolectan Human cultures tend to have a given name (by their parents) and a surname (usually their fathers, sometimes their mothers), and maybe a patronym/matronym, depending on culture. Some have no surname, just a patronym.
Goman men have a given name, a patronym, and their fathers surname. Goman women have a given name and their fathers surname.
In contrast, amongst Niocacci peoples, they have a given name and a patronym, and when they come of age they take on a chosen name of their own.

Mytarican Human cultures have more complex naming conventions. While it is similar to Malolectan conventions in northern Mytarican, it gets progressively more different as you go further south. A popular convention is that your parents combine the syllables of their names to create yours, followed by a matronym. This derived name can be accompanied by a given name, surname, and/or chosen name, depending on your tribe, nationality or culture.

Atnir have a given name, which is derived from some significant event or object that is witnessed/found by the newborn's carers within the first six days of their birth. For example, the carer of a newborn Atnir might see a one legged eagle; the newborn would be called Ej Vorat Maros; One Leg Eagle; and would be nicknamed Maros, Eagle.
At the age of twelve they would choose their adult name, perhaps in a similar fashion as their given name, perhaps after a character of legend, or just something made up; it could be anything.

Posted September 2nd, 2009 by Avjunza
View Source Quote Report
Avjunza
 

The Mokuri go Russian style, except instead of the middle name being that of their father, it is that of their clan chief, their family's oldest living male member to which all male members of the family are related. Then they have a clan name that could be any one of their dead ancestors, and this tends to vary depending on who they talk to because it is a measure of their status. Two Mokuri, when talking to each other formally, will use the name of the ancestor who was a sibling of the other Mokuri's ancestor. Once they establish this, one Mokuri usually has to use the appropriate honorific language to address the other. Within an extended family, everyone just uses personal names.

Posted September 2nd, 2009 by Cerne
View Source Quote Report
Cerne
 

Do your concultures have a limited set of anthroponyms (proper names for people)?

At one time the modern Chinese government limited personal individual names to a set of 32768 (32^3 or 8^5) names.

My Adpihi and Reptigan concultures have seven types of anthroponyms.
They give every person five names.
Three are “family names”; the name of their matriline (the same as their mother’s), the name of their patriline (the same as their father’s), and the name of their rope (the same as their parent of the opposite sex).
Two are individual personal names. Sons get their first individual name from their father and their second individual name from their mother; daughters get their first individual name from their mother and their second individual name from their father.
So the seven kinds of anthroponyms are:
  • matriline names;
  • patriline names;
  • rope names;
  • feminine first individual names;
  • masculine first individual names;
  • feminine second individual names; and
  • masculine second individual names.

    Currently I’ve allowed only 143 (12^2 -1) names of each type; that’s a total of 7*143 = 1001 names. There are fewer than 3 million possible combinations of family names. For each sex, there are over 20,000 possible combinations of first individual name and second individual name. All told there are almost 60 thousand million possible full names for each sex.

    What if I made it 4681 names of each type?
    They would add up to 7*4681 = 32,767 names.
    There’d be over 102 thousand million possible combinations of the three family names; almost 22 million combinations of first individual name and second individual name for each sex; and about 2.25 million million million possible “full names” for each sex. My thinking is, 102 thousand million could do for a large interstellar society with over a dozen populous planets. (And maybe forty or fifty less populous ones).
    OTOH two-and-a-quarter quintillion is bigger than the “quadrillions” of Asimov’s Galactic Empire and Foundation universe. More by a long shot than the minimum population Hari Seldon said were needed to make psychohistory at all a reliable science.

    How about your concultures? Do they have limited pools of anthroponyms? Are the limits small or large?

  • Posted January 11th, 2019 by chiarizio
    View Source Quote Report

    How about your concultures? Do they have limited pools of anthroponyms? Are the limits small or large?


    Haven't come across any with legal limitations. Some folks may have cultural norms or desire to use popular names, though, but nothing especially limiting.

    Posted January 12th, 2019 by elemtilas
    View Source Quote Report

    I have modifications to make to the Adpihi/Reptigan system for individual personal names.

    The purpose of naming your children after your great grandparents, your grandaunts and granduncles, your grandparents, and your aunts and uncles, is to make it unlikely, or at least less likely, that those names will disappear from your clan.

    So parents prioritize the names of deceased relatives over living relatives.

    They also prioritize names of relatives who don’t already have a (lineal or collateral) descendant named after them, over those who do.

    If a recently deceased relative, or an elderly relative, was or is the last one in their clan to bear their name, the parent is likely to put that relative’s name earlier in the sequence, than the name of other deceased or respectively living relatives.

    If a parent runs out of names from their own family to use, they may borrow names from their spouse’s (the other parent’s) family.

    —————————————————————

    At an unnamed child’s “christening” (i.e. naming ceremony), a parent will be sure to invite at least one full-sibling of their own sex, or one uterine and one agnate half-sibling of their own sex, to stand as “godparent” for the child to be named.
    As a general rule, both parents will invite every one of their siblings and half-siblings and even one-step-removed stepsiblings to be the child’s godparent, provided that person is at least twelve years older than the child. They’ll also invite their own children and maybe some of their stepchildren, if they’re old enough (the child’s full- and half- and one-step-removed stepsiblings at least twelve years older than the child).
    The child’s grandparents will invite their own siblings and half-siblings and some of their close step siblings; the parents may, and usually (or just often?) will invite such grandaunts and granduncles to become godparents.
    And a spouse of a godparent is usually included in the invitation to become godparent.

    But for the mother to have a full-sister, or both a uterine half-sister and an agnate half-sister, there to be the child’s godmother(s), will help in avoiding duplicating the name of a child’s same-sex parallel first cousin.
    So will the father having a full-brother, or both an agnate half-brother and a uterine half-brother, there to serve as the child’s godfather(s).

    They will cooperate in avoiding naming a child after a living relative who already has two or more of the child’s parallel-cousins named after them. And if it happens, the two same-namesaked children may get different nicknames from their shared godparent —— if they share a godparent.

    As we’ve seen maximal confusion arises among same-sex double-parallel-first-cousins, when either the fathers are full-brothers and the mothers are half-sisters, or the fathers are half-brothers and the mothers are full-sisters.

    ———————————————

    Based on http://conworlds.fun/cwbb/viewtopic.php?p=14632&highlight=adpihi+forename#14632 If double-parallel-first-cousins, do wind up having the same combination of first and second individual personal names, they may yet be distinguishable by name, if they were born in different years, or in different months, or in a different birth-order within their sibling-sets.

    Posted January 16th, 2019 by chiarizio
    View Source Quote Report

    Bump

    Posted March 23rd by chiarizio
    View Source Quote Report
    Reply to: Names names names...
    Enter your message here

    Rules | Report Issue | Request Feature | Roadmap Facebook Page | Discord Group
    GTX0 © 2009-2020 Xhin GameTalk © 1999-2008 lives on
    You are not forgotten, Kevin, Liane, Norma, Jason, and Garrett