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09/11/2001 WE REMEMBER

"Fear is the foundation of most governments." - John Adams

"Despite the constant negative press covfefe" - Donald Trump

Books
Posted: Posted June 15th by Smiling Apple

What books are you reading? Or have read recently?

Would you recommend them?

I've just read my first Stephen King novel - Misery - and it was a lot of fun to read. Anyone else read any Stephen King? If so, what would you recommend? (Preferably something that hasn't been made into a film I've seen already.)

Before that I read Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and thought it was a load of shite. Never been more disappointed with a book in my life. It's a mystery to me why it's considered a classic. The writing is bloody awful.

Currently reading Camus' The Plague, but only just got started, so yet to form any opinion on it.

How about you?

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There are 19 Replies

Anyone else read any Stephen King?

Just finished reading It, and really enjoyed it. Guessing you might have seen the movie for that though. I haven't, but I've heard it's not very good.

Read Under the Dome a while ago. Liked it up until the ending. Don't think I'd recommend it.

Not sure what's next for me. Maybe I'll get some ideas from this thread.



Posted June 15th by Count Dooku
Count Dooku

I really cannot recommend King's Revival enough. It's a very old-school horror story, with inspiration from Mary Shelley and Arthur Machen. It's significantly shorter than his "magnum opus" novels like IT and Insomnia, but that works much more in its favor. It doesn't dwell on cosmology, esoteric systems or garish monsters, instead focusing on interpersonal drama and one main paranormal mechanic that builds up slowly but not in a boring fashion. When the supernatural element is finally revealed, there's all the more impact in it for having not been talking about it for half the book or more. The last fifty pages or so are legitimately hair-raising in ways that I never felt that his earlier works were, even though I still enjoyed them.

Posted June 15th by nullfather
nullfather

pet sematary is good. stephen king is way overrated though

"Currently reading Camus' The Plague, but only just got started, so yet to form any opinion on it."

one of my favorite books. it's probably the best thing camus ever wrote (and i've read everything by him). let me know what you think.

Posted June 15th by poptart!
poptart!
 

i read quite a bit, although a lot less than i used to.

recently read:

the truth is a cave in the black mountains, by neil gaiman. this was the first thing i've read of his. it's sort of a dark folk tale. it's presented almost as a graphic novel, with many paintings and drawings that accompany the story.

the design of everyday things, by donald norman. have you ever not been able to open a door correctly on the first try, or not been able to operate what should have been a simple piece of technology? it's not your fault, it's that a lot of everyday objects are poorly designed. norman goes into what makes good design good and bad design bad.

best american essays 2016 - lots of good stuff in there.

the hotel new hampshire, by john irving. good story that follows a family over time. the family is dysfunctional, but they pull together when they need to. features a bear that can ride a motorcycle, and a woman who dresses up as a bear. i liked it, but if i was introducing someone to irving i would start with the world according to garp.

i would recommend all of those. i recently checked out king's newest collection of short stories, the bazaar of bad dreams. i've read most of king's older stuff, so i'm interested to see what some of his newer works are like. he's not the best, but he sure know how to captivate a reader. if you haven't read the stand yet, i would recommend that next. i think that one and it are his two best.

Posted June 15th by EN
EN

For Stephen King check out 11/22/63 great read.


I was reading a book about Napoleon and I had several more checked out but I returned them earlier today as their due date is next Monday and I don't think I could renew them online so I'll just check them out when I come back.

I'm planning to finish the book on Napoleon, Che Guevara s autobiography and Malcolm Xs autobiography.

I also recommend American gods by neilgaiman great read.



Edited June 15th by S.o.h.
S.o.h.
 

The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell.

So I was brought up in a super uneducated, fundamentalist Protestant household, and as a result I basically became a militant Dawkins-esque atheist in my late teens/early 20s. But Joseph Campbell pretty much single-handedly changed my mind on the usefulness of religion, myth and ritual over the last year or two.

Posted June 15th by pacman
pacman
 

The Culture of Critique: An Evolutionary Analysis of Jewish Involvement in Twentieth-Century Intellectual and Political Movements [Kevin MacDonald]

Edited June 15th by #85
#85

I have been reading a lot of Spanish literature lately, mostly Miguel Delibes, but the last English book I read was "Dealmaking: Negotiauctions" by Guhan Subramanian, which I highly recommend for anyone involved in running a project/business.

Posted June 16th by Malas
Malas
 

I've read the vast majority of King's work.

Salem's Lot, Pet Sematary, Cujo, and The Stand (abridged, I suggest; it is kind of long).

His older stuff seems a bit better though. One exception is Cell, which I think is one of his best. It's relatively slim and only has one point of view character. That was the first book of his I read and I still think it's good.



Posted June 16th by Agis in the US
Agis in the US
 

I've only read Pet Cemetery and Salem's Lot but that was in middle school. I've been wanting to read Dream Catcher. Any good guys?

Posted June 16th by Castrael
Castrael

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

Posted June 16th by Temerit
Temerit

Dream Catcher was okay, unique take on alien body snatchers. Not one of Kings best, though.

Posted June 16th by Agis in the US
Agis in the US
 

Im going to read Mein Kampf in its entirety, i've never read it from front to back surprisingly

Posted June 16th by #85
#85

I'm up to Dark Tower VI.

Posted June 16th by Pink Peruvian Flying Bear
Pink Peruvian Flying Bear

Would it be too "edgy" to mention the book called the lottery?

Posted June 20th by KnokkelMillennium
KnokkelMillennium

The film for Misery was amazing! I really do prefer the company of non-fiction books, however. I don't have much of a chance to read nowadays, but a couple years ago I was fascinated by art reference books. 50s Decorative Art, Animals Visual Encyclopedia, and my favorite book of all: The Illusion of Life.

The Illusion of Life is a 600-page behemoth of a book written by two of Disney's Nine Old Men: Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnson. It describes everything from Disney's animation techniques, the studio's history, the history behind the men and women who worked on the shorts and films during Disney's original heyday, and concepts for films that were never released. Page after page of beautiful full color illustrations and detailed descriptions of the inner workings of Disney's studio and the legend himself. Disney was on the cusp of discovering the concept of a video game as early as the 1940s with Hiawatha. All of the art from Hiawatha focused on the beautiful environment. His direct quote was:

"There's something there, y'know? Something we could do - Something that's right for us. Don't think of a film, don't even think of a show - Don't limit your thinking to a regular theater. Maybe it's something out in the woods, or on a mountain, maybe the people are brought in - or - I don't know - but there's something there!"

He was 60-70 years ahead of his time as open world games invoking his sense of atmosphere would not exist until the mid-late 2000s with games like Shadow of The Colossus, Okami, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, and the Metroid Prime series. Super Mario Sunshine is also an early contender, but perhaps not quite as dramatic as Disney would have liked.

Also, when he worked on Snow White (the first animated feature film ever), someone tacked a note to his desk that said "Stick to shorts." Someone in Disney's upper circle was a traitor. The mystery was never solved.

To call it a coffee table book is a disgrace: this book is the stuff of legends.

Posted June 20th by mariomguy
mariomguy

Would it be too "edgy" to mention the book called the lottery?


The Lottery is a short story. Some 8 pages, generally.

Also, 85 is here. Nothing is edgy in his light.

Disney was on the cusp of discovering the concept of a video game as early as the 1940s with Hiawatha. All of the art from Hiawatha focused on the beautiful environment. His direct quote was:


>"There's something there, y'know? Something we could do - Something that's right for us. Don't think of a film, don't even think of a show - Don't limit your thinking to a regular theater. Maybe it's something out in the woods, or on a mountain, maybe the people are brought in - or - I don't know - but there's something there!"


I'm not following your reasoning here. The sublime has always appeared in great art and I don't know why Disney in particular would be the one to supposedly foreshadow video games. Could you explain more?

[EDIT: I kind of see what you're talking about, but it's a very vague idea at best.]

He was 60-70 years ahead of his time as open world games invoking his sense of atmosphere would not exist until the mid-late 2000s with games like Shadow of The Colossus, Okami, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, and the Metroid Prime series. Super Mario Sunshine is also an early contender, but perhaps not quite as dramatic as Disney would have liked.


I wouldn't say mid-late 2000s. With series like Half-Life, System Shock, Myst and many more coming out in the '90s, a powerful sense of atmosphere was already in play for a lot of the more visionary developers. Hell, I'd even argue that ASCII roguelike games like NetHack have their own sense of sublime and atmospheric design, and those started in the '80s.

Edited June 21st by nullfather
nullfather

"Would it be too "edgy" to mention the book called the lottery?"

not even close to "edgy"

but it is scifi so i mean i'm still going to judge you

Posted June 21st by poptart!
poptart!
 

I picked up a few books out here in Maui. One on Hawaiin history, one on the Filipino And U.S. war and one on Exorcisms in the United States. Kinda spooked to read the latter of the three though.

I'm going to finish Neverwhere by Neil gaiman and get started on my stack of books.

Posted June 21st by S.o.h.
S.o.h.
 
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