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What's your favorite story/book in 3rd-person omniscient
Posted: Posted December 18th, 2019 by Cetasaurus
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Our Dungeon Master passed away, and I floated out the idea to the rest of the party of novelizing our campaign.

I'll have to read some third-person narration to remember how it even works.

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Virtually anything by Stephen King is a good reference point for this; hell, I pattern most of my writing off of him.

Posted December 18th, 2019 by Black Yoshi
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Seconding Stephen King. Unfortunately, my personal favorite work of his, Revival, is first-person.

Well, you can never go wrong with the Dark Tower series. It's third-person and it also happens to follow along with a halfway-traditional weird fiction style that somewhat resembles a lot of the values of D&D-style writing.

Posted December 18th, 2019 by Cruinn-Annuin
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The Dark Tower is about as great an American fantasy series as it gets.

Posted December 18th, 2019 by Laxan
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Laxan
 

The Dark Tower is about as great an American fantasy series as it gets.


I'm somewhat inclined to agree. It easily rests among The Wheel of Time, The Sword of Truth, A Song of Ice and Fire, etc. in it's scope and quality. One way in which it clearly excels beyond all of the rest of those series, however, is in the "American" part of the "great American fantasy" phrase.

It has the guts to actually be set in America (and, well, some other places that are essentially a mythologized post-apocalypse America) and to present specific themes relating to the culture that range from nostalgic to scathing. King has always been good at weaving the fantastic into the mundane, but it reaches entirely new heights with The Dark Tower. King's America becomes a strange, elaborate fantasy setting not just because of the elements that he introduces to it, but very pointedly also because of the elements of America that he appears to unveil the fantastical and horrifying nature of.

One of the main conflicts of the series is the attempt to protect a wild rose growing in an empty lot from a faceless, ethereal corporation that wants to crush it and build a condo in its place. This conflict has direct implications for the continued existence of the multiverse. It's both ridiculous and entirely reasonable.

Posted December 18th, 2019 by Cruinn-Annuin
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American Fantasy......


American Gods. It's in the name.


But I agree I picked up The Gunslinger and while I gave up the first time about 5 years ago I am pleasantly enjoying it now.

So much so it has inspired my next tattoo.

Posted December 19th, 2019 by S.o.h.
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S.o.h.
 

Thanks! You have convinced me to finally read Stephen King.

Posted January 4th by Ceta
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Ceta
 

Thanks! You have convinced me to finally read Stephen King.


Careful the Gunslinger is Slow. It does not pick up until the last 30 pages or so. Just push through it. The 2nd book is really good but there are times it does bog down a bit. I am 1/4th of the way done with the third book and I am enjoying it.

Posted January 4th by S.O.H.
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S.O.H.
 

I'll remember that, thanks

Posted January 4th by Ceta
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Ceta
 

Been reading The Way of Shadows, book one in the Night Angel Trilogy by Brent Weeks. Great read. Magically inclined assassins, political intrigue, gritty dark fantasy setting. I'm finding myself as fascinated by it as I was with the Black Company series.

Posted January 5th by Locke Bellemir
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American Gods. It's in the name.


American Gods is a great novel and I respect Neil Gaiman greatly as an artist. His command of comparative mythology is rivaled by few pop artists. However, American Gods is not even close to the Dark Tower in terms of depth, quality of prose or most other facets of literary criticism.

In the particular context of works that mythologize modern America, I would say that the Dark Tower does a much more comprehensive and sublime job. American Gods had the subtlety of a sledgehammer, even compared to Stephen "it looked like a vagina" King. King has a particularly deft sense for presenting elements of modern America in bittersweet ways, and for making small things iconic. From something as heavily symbolic as a six-shooter to something as comparatively mundane as a quarter-dollar piece (the eagle! sign of a kingdom a thousand years past!), they all have a certain weight to them.

I would argue that it would be unfair to directly compare them, however. A single decent work by one author against the magnum opus of another is a little silly. Perhaps if Gaiman had had seven volumes of up to a thousand pages each, he would have produced something to rival DT. I don't think so, however. American Gods was a big old-fashioned tall tale, with many "unnecessary" details omitted in favor of a broad-brushed story that was larger-then-life - as it well should be for a story about wars among gods. Dark Tower was a tragedy about humans, and it was steeped in their lives.

In addition (though this is a finicky point that I find problematic myself), the issue was about American fantasy series while American Gods was a single novel. Because of the implication, I would not even consider American Gods among the running - not because of a lack of quality, but because it's not the kind of thing that I think we were talking about.

If we were to make the much better comparison from the same authors, we would compare the Dark Tower against Gaiman's Sandman. And then the comparison would still be excessively complicated due to the shift in format.

Edited February 2nd by 9x19
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9x19
 
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