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WARNING: Mature content possible. Proceed with caution.

I recently switched jobs. I currently work in a distribution center. I have no idea why. I've been going back and forth between getting an apartment up there (got a bit of a commute) or working to get something in my field.

Originally (back in March) the goal was to get some kind of living wage job and pour its money into setting up my art business but somewhere around that time everything got fucked so I'm making a slow recovery from all that and maybe then I'll figure out wtf I'm doing.

For the time being though I'm making relatively good money (14$/hr).

What about you guys? Where do you work? What are your career goals?

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Iíve been working at a grocery store for 10 years, part-time, as a cashier. Iíve had enough. I went back to school in Fall 2014 and still going pretty strong. I have talked to my advisor yesterday and Iím thinking of dropping my associates and begin an apprenticeship program there.

But, I think my idea is: finish going to school and get my Associates Degree. 2 classes in Spring, 1 in summer, and 2 in Fall. I canít afford full-time.

That way, I have the option to continue school if I want and possibly get my Bachelors in either English or History. School will be a bit of a commute if I do decide to transfer tho. :/

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Castrael

I have a 9-5 desk job as a survey and data analyst. I just pivoted out of academia and am mostly happy for it. I enjoy interpreting and visualizing data, so I'll probably stay in this line of work for a while while trying to move up within the company. Long-term however, I'd like to try starting my own business or at least do something different, but I'm content for the time being.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Jahoy Hoy

Well I've been in China for the last 5 years, first as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English, then teaching English and studying Chinese, then did a one year graduate program in Chinese last year. I was doing an internship this past Summer in Beijing with a research consultancy firm that focuses on Chinese politics and economics. My goal was to leverage the program and internship into a job that, well, wasn't English teaching.

And it worked! A couple months ago I received a job offer from an American ngo that serves US business interests. I'll be a policy analyst on the government affairs team. It'll be a great opportunity to work on relevant issues in China's government as well as meeting all kinds of people who work in China.

But the last two months I've just been at home in Michigan jumping through hoops to get a work visa to China, which has really sucked. Hope to be back in 2-3 weeks though.

Edited October 25th, 2018 by Agis
Agis
 

What does everyone do for a living?

Admissions Counselor for my Alma Mater

Why?

I had been doing something similar for 6 and a half years. In that time I was making the state minimum wage (I left when It got to 11 dollars an hour) now I make 2.4x more in this position with great benefits. ($26 an hour I'm salary though) The only problem is Ive been working more or less non stop since I got hired and I am pushing 60+ hours in some weeks. Every one I work with a great though. The real drawback comes with the commuting (As I over see 27+ schools in a county 70 miles north from where I live) the second draw back is the number of entitled students I deal with (both HS and College transfers)


What do you want to do?

I would like to teach History at the College level. My current position will pay for my graduate degree. But due to the nature of the work it is challenging juggling grad school and our travel seasons.


Edited October 25th, 2018 by S.O.H.
S.O.H.
 

I worked in IT for a company from 2009 until early 2013 and then went back to school, but ended up working at another company doing IT again for the same program since Dec. 2013. Got a BA in 2017 for Sociology but was thinking about going back for my master's. I'd want to be a social worker but social work practically everywhere around here requires a master's. Luckily the place I've been working at since 2013 is really accommodating to my schedule. They qualify me as a "consultant" so I can come in whenever I want (except weekends), work however long I want, etc. Technically it's my own "business" which is pretty cool because I can tax write off my miles driving, owning a computer, etc. The downside is that I don't get holiday pay and I'm not covered by any of the company's insurance/401k.

Until this summer my pay was always the same (12.50/hour or $100 per day) and this summer I negotiated to get a raise so now I'm doing $14/hour. Not too bad but I have (kinda high) rent to make now. Luckily I fully paid off my car in only 3 years. I am usually pretty frugal and don't spend it very much.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Fox Forever

If you're interested in jumping straight into a case worker job in New York City, you can always join Children's Corps. It's something I considered doing after Peace Corps.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Agis
Agis
 

I'll look into something like that to see all of the options. I'm totally open to moving but I know that my wife both dislikes NY and wants to stick around SO Cal since a good portion of her family is there. Thanks for the information though, I will definitely look into it!

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Fox Forever

As some one who works a caseload:


The work never ends. they just keep coming. Knock out 10 another 20 take its place.

send help

Posted October 25th, 2018 by S.O.H.
S.O.H.
 

Yeah I've heard that before, too. The only jobs around here that I could get with the degree are a behavioral therapist and those people's reviews about the job are always that the casework keeps coming and they have to keep traveling all the time. I've heard the same about young lawyers who only have literal minutes with each client if you did them the same day you picked up the case.

But if I never took chances like that I'd never get anywhere.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Fox Forever

No worries, hope it all goes well with you. So Cal would be tough to leave, that's one place I'd consider going to if I found the right job.

And SOH, I know you just started this job, and it's stressful af from the sound of it, but with that kind of experience and your previously expressed interest in China, you should know that you could make bank as an education consultant in China. That's always an option you can pursue in the next few years.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Agis
Agis
 

And SOH, I know you just started this job, and it's stressful af from the sound of it, but with that kind of experience and your previously expressed interest in China, you should know that you could make bank as an education consultant in China. That's always an option you can pursue in the next few years.


Tell me more! I actually talked to a Peace Corps recruiter yesterday. I am looking at the Dominican Republic but she encouraged me to look at other areas as well specifically in education. (Currently looking at Youth Development Volunteer) What would the Pay be like?

I met an Admissions Counselor from Alaska who worked as a Educational Consultant/ Counselor for a Japanese University. He loved it.

Yeah I've heard that before, too. The only jobs around here that I could get with the degree are a behavioral therapist and those people's reviews about the job are always that the casework keeps coming and they have to keep traveling all the time. I've heard the same about young lawyers who only have literal minutes with each client if you did them the same day you picked up the case.


I was thinking about Law School too mostly because of the money.

At the moment I would be happy working part time and walking away with 30-40k a year. Oddly enough I would need my masters to hit that sort of income.

Edited October 25th, 2018 by S.O.H.
S.O.H.
 

I'm a product copywriter. $16 an hour and I work from home a few days a week. I'm going to start looking for something else soonóthe pay is actually below average for the profession, and there are days where it's a mad rush to hit my deadlines (although, every once in awhile, I get easy shit and finish my work stupid early so I guess it evens out in the end).

Posted October 25th, 2018 by poptart!

I'm in my second semester of nursing school. I'll have my BSN at the end of 2019 assuming I'm able to keep passing grades. I've had all A's and B's so far so I don't anticipate any major trouble.

I currently work PRN (as needed) for a nearby hospital as a patient care tech. I work in the post-op area so all of the patients are still heavily affected by the anesthesia. We make sure that the patients are stable before sending them home or back to another floor of the hospital. I usually work one shift per week which works well with my busy school schedule. It's $14/hour but what I really want is hospital working experience so I will not have a difficult time finding a nursing job once I graduate.

Before starting this program at the beginning of the year, I worked as an insurance claims adjuster for 4 years from 2013-2017. When I left I was making about $27/hour and the job was pretty easy, but it was not rewarding and my company felt highly unstable. Day-to-day became very mundane and I wanted my life to have a little more action.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Vandy

Before starting this program at the beginning of the year, I worked as an insurance claims adjuster for 4 years from 2013-2017. When I left I was making about $27/hour and the job was pretty easy, but it was not rewarding and my company felt highly unstable. Day-to-day became very mundane and I wanted my life to have a little more action.

whats the starting pay for nurses in your part of texas? here is $33/hour. And if you want action you got it.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by S.O.H.
S.O.H.
 

I usually see around $24-$28 for starting nurses. It's higher in California but so are the living expenses so things even out. If I make close to what I was making at my old job once I start with nursing I will be okay with that. The ceiling is a lot higher here and career options more diverse.

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Vandy

third year medical student, avg 80 hour work weeks (including clinical/study/research/extracurricular), negative pay, and everyone hates you :P

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Ophelia

@Vandy: what do you do as an insurance claims adjuster? How do you get into that field?

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Xhin
Xhin
Nature is beautiful

I had a lot typed and it was lost ... I'll try again ...

Posted October 25th, 2018 by Vandy

No college experience needed. You can work claims with a highschool education; several of my co-workers did. Just start applying. I had zero experience when I was hired. I did have a referral that probably helped, though. I began with a salary of $35k and ended with $56k in four years time which I think is pretty good growth. However I think that's close to the ceiling for most companies. I worked in non-standard insurance, which are smaller companies that sell cheaper policies to people that 1) cannot afford better coverage 2) cannot get better coverage because of bad history 3) maybe they just want to save money?

In a nutshell (for auto claims): you talk to all parties involved in an accident. Order and read police reports if necessary, and if available. Determine who is at fault (sometimes split liability like 70/30, etc). You will find out that no one, in any circumstance, thinks they are at fault. You get to tell them that they are anyway. They will hate you. Pay for the vehicle repairs that the policy covers. You will have to deal with a lot of auto repair shops, and they are often just as big of a hassle as the people in the accident. Appraisers will write up estimates for the repairs and you pay this amount. It should be that simple, but again, you're dealing with people that will never agree with anything you say.

Then you have injury claims. Higher level adjusters usually work injury claims, and it usually involves more money. Sometimes you can pay and get these handled quickly. But usually people want to go to chiropractors or something similar that you have to deal with. People will claim injuries on minor accidents such as parking lot bumps. In most cases you cannot outright deny these, even when you know it's impossible they are injured. But it's part of it.

Attorney-represented injury claims are usually handled by a separate department, and in my opinion, this is the best area to be. This is where I was when I quit. It is the best balance of good pay with a reasonable workload. You don't have to deal with the actual people involved because you work with their attorney. This is good and bad because you will avoid a lot of difficult people, but attorneys can be real dicks too. There are a lot of factors on payouts for these claims. If your insured was DUI, you're going to pay a lot. If your insured has a significant criminal history, you're going to pay a lot. The county, and how conservative it is, plays a big role. Courts hate insurance companies in south texas. In those counties, we would basically pay our maximum no matter what. Things like this are frustrating, but it's part of it.

The worst thing about auto claims is that you can get overloaded if you don't get claims closed quickly. Things get backed up. Your phone won't stop ringing. You'll have 50 voicemails in a day and just as many emails. Your manager will start getting calls and asking why you are not returning calls. It can be a downward spiral. In my experience this was more true for lower-level departments. Once I began working attorney claims, the workload got smaller because the timeframe on attorney claims are expected to be much longer.

Edited October 25th, 2018 by Vandy

More like what does everyone do for a dying. Youíre already alive and work is gonna kill you.

Posted October 26th, 2018 by I killed Mufasa
I killed Mufasa
long live the king

work is not going to kill you.

Posted October 26th, 2018 by s.o.h.
s.o.h.
 

Work does kill you eventually. Remember the sign that said arbeit macht frei that meant work makes you free it was referring to your SELF self sacrifice by endless labor. Death is release . Death is freedom

Edited October 26th, 2018 by Brandy

Youre gonna die eventually and it wont be because of work. (hopefully)

You mean the sign placed over a goddam nazi death camp? It is quite distasteful and appalling to compare our meager jobs to what those individuals had to go through.

Edited October 26th, 2018 by S.O.H.
S.O.H.
 

I used to work as ProSupport Agent for Dell for about year and half (technically a year and 3/4). Wouldn't do it again. Those of you who said that you're under case load I know exactly how you feel (considered I worked in a small PC repair shop 6 years prior to that). Imagine that with "coaching" thrown in about your metrics and constantly have to deal with a high work load with metrics being shoved up your ass. The politics, inconsistency and polices ruined it (though most my teamamtes were awesome to work with).

Why'd I do it? 'cause I enjoy tech and helping folks at the same. Though with Dell it's more of Tech Support rather than actual real world IT experience. Constantly having a caseload (had 60 at most at one point) along with trying to get cases closed out. To keep it short - it was a waste of a year and a half. The only real thing I gained was how Dell likes to do things along with dealing with angry folks.

Dell is not the worst call center you will encounter, but DO NOT recommend you work in a call center: it's soul crushing (many nights of eating and passing out in bed without doing anything else).

I currently work for a small IT company based out of Wichita Falls Texas (they have a satellite office where I live now in my home town). I work as Tier1 triaging tickets and also doing remote monitoring. I also usually try to resolve issues that come in first before escalating things.

It gets busy, but no where near the level of Dell. One of our guys quit so it's going to be a bit busier.

Posted October 27th, 2018 by Forte Lambardi

Happy to see that you are doing well forte.

Posted October 29th, 2018 by S.o h.
S.o h.
 

Technology manager at an independent arthouse cinema. I work at a frozen yogurt shop on the side for some extra cash.

I enjoy what I do just fine, but it's definitely not my "passion." (It was more enjoyable for me when projection was mechanical rather than digital.)

Not sure what I'll do, since the house pretty much ensures I have no money to take classes. But I'm thinking about trying to get into social work, maybe with a focus on helping victims of domestic violence navigate a path out of their situations. I've found myself as a go-to support for someone twice in my life now. And as intense as it is, I'm finding I have the capacity to be involved and a drive to help. But, it's unlikely I will change jobs any time soon due to financial reasons.

Posted October 30th, 2018 by Jet Presto

Happy to see that you are doing well forte.

Thank you good sir. I lurk here more than posting.



Posted October 30th, 2018 by Forte Lambardi

i want to write childrens books probably

Posted October 31st, 2018 by Susurrous

You will find out that no one, in any circumstance, thinks they are at fault. You get to tell them that they are anyway. They will hate you.

I think in a lot of cases, people do know if they are at fault (or at least partily), but they will not admit it because... well that would make them look bad and that will raise their insurance asap.

If somebody lies(which happens all the time), do you ever raise their insurance more than usual vs someone who just outright contacts the insurance agency and says they were at fault?

Posted November 1st, 2018 by ShadowFox08
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