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We're gonna need a bigger boat.

Shooting off from mariomguy's thread, there was a comment made about not liking the direction of scores and soundtracks.

This was fascinating to me because I overall find movie and video game scores of today to be among the best ever. There are a lot of generic sounding scores in the summer blockbuster scene, but even Marvel Studios has started to actually create memorable scores that stand out, most notably with Mark Mothersbaugh composing the score for Thor: Ragnarok and Ludwig Goransson scoring Black Panther (both easily the best scores in the franchise). And I'm struck by the importance of, say, Hans Zimmer's score in Christopher Nolan's "Dunkirk." And then I think about the significance of Junkie XL's score in Mad Max: Fury Road and even his contributions to Batman v. Superman (creating the first and, thus far, only real memorable character theme in any superhero film of the modern era).

So, what are your thoughts on the matter? What are some of your favorite movie scores in the past decade or so?

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There are 150 Replies

I can\'t say I care much one way or another for scores and soundtracks. But some that come to mind:

Watchmen

Had some of the best songs included, and included well, for me personally.

Pulp Fiction

This is like my favorite movie, and nearly every song fits perfectly. I\'m willing to say that Tarantino puts a lot of great songs into his movies. I went to a presentation about Django Unchained and how the songs chosen for it were deliberately taken from other movies in order to invert the racial dynamics. So, very deep.

Baby Driver

I include this because I really disliked the movie, and the soundtrack was a big reason why it was annoying. Couldn\'t even finish it.

Drive

But on the flip side, this ultra cool movie (also about a guy with a car who commits crimes) has some really cool and stylish songs. Don\'t think it would have been the same movie without the kinds of songs it chose.

Posted September 7th by Agis
Agis
 

Don’t really pay attention to music when I watch movies but I do like Marie antionettes soundtrack (2005) got me into bow wow wow which i listen to now and wouldn’t of heard of them if I didn’t see the movie

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Edited September 7th by Brandy

When it comes to the film side of things, I'm still a plebe. However, music is very important to me, so I do have some kind of in.

The Matrix. Manson, Prodigy, Rob Zombie, Ministry, Deftones, Rammstein, Rage Against the Machine and more make this what is, in my opinion, a nearly perfect soundtrack. Despite covering various genres, it all fit the themes and tone very well. It also includes one of the most iconic electronic tracks ever, Clubbed to Death, which instantly and effortlessly evokes the atmosphere of the film.

Baby Driver. While I didn't personally like a lot of the music, the idea of the main character's deep connection with it and his use of it to make the world bearable is one that resonates with me. With the movie directed with perfect consideration to the role of the soundtrack, it's kind of hard to not include this in a "favorite soundtracks" list.

Inception. Hans Zimmer's score, particularly the piece Time, is poignant and powerful.

Drive. As Agis said, it would not have been the same movie without at least Night Call and A Real Hero.

Honorable mentions to Black Panther for Kendrick's tracks. Thanks to my hiphop-head best friend, I've recently gotten into Kendrick and found his contributions enjoyable, even if I didn't personally identify with it.

Posted September 7th by Cruinn-Annuin

When I made that comment, I was specifically refereing to the Hollywood blockbusters (I’m not really film savvy enough to get into lesser known stuff).

I don’t really think it’s much different than my dislike of modern pop. Production wise, it has never been better. And I appreciate good production. But the composing of music on a computer as opposes to by hand seems to have led to leas melodic diversity. Essentially, I think modern score composers act too much as producers and don’t put enough thought into the composition itself. It just comes across as bland, static and unmemorable. Memorable musical themes combined with movie scenery can have a lifelong impact on a person. For instance, think about John Williams projects such as Star Wars and Jurassic Park. The production is good, but clearly composition and melody were at the forefront of Williams’s mind. And it pays off with unique, memorable tunes and movements that people associate with the movie forever. Hell, even fucking Home Alone had a better score than it had any right to lol.

As opposed to current trends - repeated melodic phrases in different tones/timbres and lack of overall melodic diversity. Overuse of war drums, even in movies that aren’t remotely warlike. Reliance on production rather than composition abilities (for instance, using mere volume or effects to create dynamics rather than actual musical tension and variation).

Like I said though, I don’t completely hate newer scores, and if forced I could list many positive attributes. Just not my cup of tea.

Posted September 7th by pacman

video game scores

I do like Hans Zimmer. Skyrim has an amazing score and actually well written folk songs too.

Edited September 7th by pacman

See, I don't think the problem with modern Hollywood blockbuster scores is that it's too synthetic or feels "produced" rather than "conducted."

Posted September 7th by Jet Presto

(Sorry, cut that post short because I've been having trouble signing in and didn't want to type a whole thing only to have it get lost.)

Posted September 7th by Jet Presto

I enjoyed the pacific rim sound track.

The score in halo 3 odst was quite engaging and enjoyable

Posted September 7th by S.o h
S.o h
 

So, here are a few tracks from major blockbuster films of the past decade.

From "The Hunger Games"



From "Transformers"



From "Justice League"



From "War for the Planet of the Apes"



From "Infinity War"





The issue isn't that these tracks feel "produced" more than they feel composed. Blockbusters are still largely using orchestral performances, and many studios are still relying upon some of the best composers in the business to do this. Marvel has tapped the Alan Silvestri well a number of times, Danny Elfman has been as active as ever, and Hans Zimmer has gotten plenty of work from Warner Brothers. The problem is that studios generally want to play it safe musically. They want scores to be in the background, or to really just push an emotion when the film falls short of it. (This was especially true for Marvel Studios, who went from stuff like this in Thor:



To stuff like this in Thor: Ragnarok:



Or stuff like this in the Incredible Hulk:



To stuff like this in Black Panther:



Granted, all that's happened is they've let composers and filmmakers have more say over the score. It makes sense that Black Panther would incorporate more hip hop sounds, and so hiring Ludwig Goransson - known for television scores and producing Childish Gambino albums - take the reigns, or for Thor: Ragnarok being more of a Buck Rogers inspired movie, to let '80s icon Mark Mothersbaugh take over.)




Posted September 7th by Jet Presto

I think I would actually argue that, especially in the past few years, studios have been MORE willing to let composers do what they want to do. The early aughts to the early 2010s saw more studio control over almost every element of a film's development, but the past 5 years in particular really feels like they've seen - generally - that letting filmmakers and creators have more control than they had been given can yield greater results and even impress audiences more. That's why for all the problems of the DC cinematic franchise, the scores have not been the problem. Hans Zimmer crafted a solid Superman theme, even if not as iconic as John Williams's. Junkie XL gave us the only memorable character anthem for Wonder Woman (love it or hate it, it's identifiable which is the point of such tracks), and Danny Elfman managed to rework the 1980s Batman theme into his score for Justice League. Similarly, the last three solo Marvel films featured the following tracks:

From Thor: Ragnarok:



From Black Panther:



From Ant-Man and the Wasp:




In fact, the score even was allowed to become present for a few comedic bits within Thor: Ragnarok and Ant-Man and the Wasp, which is actually pretty neat given that we don't see a lot of blockbusters utilize their scores for such purposes.


I think, in part, it's something Warner Brothers has definitely done a good job with. Again, for all the shit their movies get, few really complain about their scores. (Although I don't understand why you hire Steven Price for Suicide Squad if you're just going to cram the film with nothing but licensed music that never takes on any sort of cohesive tone or theme.)

Steven Price did one of my favorite scores in years with his work on Attack the Block:




Posted September 7th by Jet Presto

Video game music >>>>> movie music. That's pretty much all that comes to mind right now.

Posted September 7th by KnokkelMillennium

I don't see a difference, myself. I think both are generally pretty great, and I rely on both to get through my exercise routines. Video games tend to be a bit more action-driven as well, while movie scores tend to cover the gamut of emotional beats. (Speaking generally, obviously, not universally.)

That said, one of my favorite film scores in recent years was the synth-heavy tracks from Disasterpeace of It Follows:



And one of my favorite video game scores in recent years was the mellow acoustic sounds of Syd Matters in Life is Strange:



(And yes, I know, Disasterpeace has done video game scores as well. Point here being there is plenty of crossover.)

Posted September 7th by Jet Presto

Also, y'all probably already know this about me, but I fucking loooooved Baby Driver. Loved the soundtrack, loved the film. Probably something that needs no stating, but I will pretty much eat up whatever Edgar Wright does. I don't think there's a single track on the soundtrack that I don't just love, and the way they get applied and edited into the film. It's exactly the type of thing I love, personally.

Posted September 7th by Jet Presto

Favorite Scores and Soundtracks
  • Lord of the Rings (I listen to this when I'm writing or reading usually.)
  • Rent!
  • Lord of the Dance and the Celtic Tiger by Ronan Hardiman

    I'm also a big fan of trailer music, which I started getting into a few years ago. Mostly stuff from Audiomachine and Two Steps From Hell though. I listen to them when I write or read as well. Or, I just want to chill.

  • Posted September 7th by Castrael

    I've done this a lot, so I'll try one just about hidden gems: songs we don't immediately recognize, but make the movie a thousand times better:

    Nemo Egg - Finding Nemo



    This is the song that plays when Marlin is looking through all the eggs that got eaten by the barracuda at the beginning of Finding Nemo, only to find out everyone in his life was eaten... except for one egg, he named Nemo. It's the most pivotal point in the story, and the soundtrack is just perfect!

    Fairytale - Shrek



    An intro a-la Beauty and The Beast, quickly cut short by a bathroom break and Smash Mouth. This song is the antithesis of this movie. It's grand, larger than life, sweeping, epic, romantic... which the movie serves to show is all a farce. In our first minute we have the entire rest of the film.

    Through Heaven's Eyes - The Prince of Egypt



    Another pivotal moment in the story, this is the turning point in Moses' life where he leaves Egypt and his Princehood to be with his people. This song does a better job explaining the bible than practically all hymns do. While "When You Believe" may have taken home the Oscar, "Through Heaven's Eyes" will definitely leave a lasting impression.

    Posted September 7th by mariomguy

    This song is the antithesis of this movie


    Well Shrek is good because it's the antithesis to several things.

    Through Heaven's Eyes - The Prince of Egypt




    That reminds me personally I preferred the plagues. It has that sort of intensity I like. Plus there have been several situations where it seemed fairly fitting to post it!

    Edited September 7th by KnokkelMillennium

    That reminds me personally I preferred the plagues. It has that sort of intensity I like. Plus there have been several situations where it seemed fairly fitting to post it!

    Yes! That song was intense! The only thing that was more intense was what came after it...

    Posted September 7th by mariomguy

    See, I don't think the problem with modern Hollywood blockbuster scores is that it's too synthetic or feels "produced" rather than "conducted."

    Oh no, it’s definitely not the production value that I think is lacking. Like I said, I appreciate good production. The issue I have is that newer scores tend to use stellar production almost as a stand-in for quality composing imo. I see the same pattern across all genres of modern music, but it’s especially prevalent in the background music for movies and trailers.


    Posted September 8th by pacman

    Also to whoever said LOTR. I think that is one of the most beautiful, fitting and cohesive scores ever as far as an entire film franchise goes. Harry Potter would be up there too imo if John Williams had stuck around.

    Posted September 8th by pacman

    I blame Hans Zimmer. Zimmer's style goes for bigger production over stonger composing and slants away from John William's style of extremely strong composing where the production sort of sneaks in. While Jurassic Park has a very memorable melody, Zimmer's scores are not as iconic, but they still fit the film and tend to take on a darker and more serious tone.





    Posted September 8th by mariomguy

    Should be worth noting that things don't have to be iconic to be truly amazing. I don't think John Williams could do a score like Hans Zimmer could for something like Dunkirk, for example. This isn't an "iconic" track, but "Submarine" is one of the most important songs I've ever heard in a film, with its usage of audio illusions and the consistent ticking going a long, long way to perfectly fitting with the film itself in pushing the anxious feeling of dread and impending doom. Williams rarely did these types of scores. If you needed wonder or adventure, Williams is your guy. If you need something a bit darker, more serious, or more emotionally complex, Zimmer might be your guy.



    Posted September 8th by Jet Presto

    When you have a melody, you can really own the sound, though. Music with very loose "sound" tends to become much more muddy and generic. The most melodic thing Zimmer made was probably Pirates of the Caribbean, but John Williams can still do incredible things like the battle between Anakin and Obi Wan. Same guy that scored The Terminal also made this. William's range was far greater and more specific than any other composer. If your film had a score by John Williams, it's melody would instantly be enshrined in pop culture psyche. Zimmer... not so much.



    In many ways, Williams did for movies what Koji Kondo did for games.

    Posted September 8th by mariomguy

    Music with very loose "sound" tends to become much more muddy and generic.


    I take it that you're not much a fan of drone music or noise, then, despite the amazing amount of experimentation that artists in those genres do with tone, texture and all the other elements of music beyond melody?

    Posted September 8th by Cruinn-Annuin

    Zimmer is an amazing composer when he actually tries with forming melodies. If The Dark Knight score had been on the level of Skyrim...

    Posted September 8th by pacman

    If you need something a bit darker, more serious, or more emotionally complex, Zimmer might be your guy.

    I kind of agree, kind of disagree. Zimmer can produce a sort of gloomy, postmodern sound that Williams probably could not. But I disagree that it’s impossible to create such darkness through melody and harmonic tension alone, or that such tunes phrases couldn’t be memorable and iconic.

    Posted September 8th by pacman

    It also really just depends on the movie. I really don't think John Williams would be a good fit for any Christopher Nolan film, whereas I can't think of any composer that would better capture the Nolan essence than Hans Zimmer.

    Ya know, it's kinda funny because we can compare the two with their composition for Superman.

    Zimmer's music for Superman was easily among my favorite elements of Man of Steel, and it fits perfectly with the dark and "gritty" nature of Zack Snyder's world. But it also maybe highlights a big difference in the way he composes cinematically versus how Williams does.

    "Flight" is easily the best track of the score, and kind of stands in as a sort of theme for Superman. But it's also used explicitly for a scene. I happen to think this music is perfectly fitting for the *scene,* and everything happening within it.




    Conversely, John Williams's theme for the character is among his most iconic work, and has come to be associated with the character since the film came out. It is so ingrained at this point that when Danny Elfman incorporated it into the Justice League score, it was instantly recognizable and fundamentally exciting (despite nothing in the movie being exciting or compelling). Williams scored an excellent, all-time great anthem, that works for almost any introductory scene with the character. It is focused less on the goings-on of the film, however.




    Both, I think, are incredibly well used in their respective films. And I don't think they are at all interchangeable. They do seem to focus a bit on different philosophies toward scoring films, though.

    Posted September 8th by Jet Presto

    Also, taking a moment to acknowledge we are very, very focused on western composers. Would like to take a moment to give a shout out to my all-time favorite cinematic composer in Akira Ifukube, who not everyone seems to know despite also creating one of the all-time great and memorable character anthems:




    As well as so many incredible tracks for (a criminally under-appreciated, even if well-known) film.




    And, while I'm stuck on how under-appreciated Godzilla scores are, let me also shout out Masaru Sato, who created such wonky, mixed tracks in the late '60s, early '70s.





    Posted September 8th by Jet Presto

    The Godzilla soundtrack is so memorable. I used to be able to play parts of it on the guitar.

    The Trainspotting soundtrack is my favorite tho

    Posted September 8th by poptart!

    What benefits you gain from scoring for a "scene" rather than an anthem for the film is the "scene" scores are merely incidental, and happen as the movie is playing. Even Flight does not embody the pure emblem that is the Superman theme. And while Williams did score scenes as well, he found ways to emblazon them so they sound bigger than life. It's a John Williams score that makes you want to get out of your seat to go see a movie. Now, Hans Zimmer scores are a dime a dozen, but John Williams stood the test of time.



    Posted September 8th by mariomguy

    Also to whoever said LOTR. I think that is one of the most beautiful, fitting and cohesive scores ever as far as an entire film franchise goes. Harry Potter would be up there too imo if John Williams had stuck around.


    I was going to add in Harry Potter too, but he only did the first three films I think?

    I forgot to add The Patriot by John Williams. Really good. I do like POTC as well.

    Posted September 8th by Castrael

    See, I disagree. I don't think scoring for a scene is just incidental. And I totally disagree with your take on "Flight." There are so few stand-out moments to Man of Steel (in my opinion), and so little of it feels like Superman to me. But that scene with "Flight" blasting over the surround sound speakers of the theater works so damn well, despite all the problems with the film overall. I think it was so important to score that sequence well because the rest of the film isn't cohesive enough to really merit a single anthem. (I also don't think John Williams's more adventure-oriented style would work - seriously, you can't just plug his anthem into that scene and have the scene work.) And while there's no shortage of truly "incidental" movie music (again, this is definitely something that plagued Marvel movies for a long time until recent years), I absolutely think that "Flight" is literally the reason that scene in Man of Steel actually works. Hans Zimmer scores are not a "dime a dozen," and his tracks are rarely "incidental." They are more often than most, integral to the success of a scene. It's not background music, nor is it generic, paint-by-numbers, studio-driven music that comes from Zimmer. You might think he's a lesser composer than John Williams because he doesn't go for iconic (which is sort of an absurd standard, to be honest), but you simply cannot say that Hans Zimmer scores are a "dime a dozen." Many have tried to imitate elements of his sound, but literally none have worked anywhere near as well because Zimmer is one of the best. He might not have the same number of iconic tracks, but his sound is unmistakable.



    I also want to give room for the excellent scores of less commercial films. I know I already mentioned Disasterpeace's "It Follows" score, or Steven Price's score for "Attack the Block," but I also want to mention some others I absolutely adore:

    Benh Zeitlin's score for "Beasts of the Southern Wild:"




    SOH already called it out but Ramin Djawadi's score for "Pacific Rim" is absolutely excellent:




    The Chemical Brothers were a stand out for their scoring of "Hanna:"




    I've grown a bit weary of Wes Anderson, but having Mark Mothersbaugh frequently score his films has worked out pretty well, and none better than his score for "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou:"




    I was also super into the score for "Eighth Grade," in particular this track from Anna Meredith:




    Also, I still can't get over how goddamn good Blade Runner 2049 was, and how much I fucking love this score. (I'm choosing one of the less mellow tracks, though.)




    I also quite like the "Mongol" score:




    I realized I didn't post it, but perhaps the track that is the single most perfect embodiment of the film it is in from the past decade is this Junkie XL track from "Mad Max: Fury Road:"




    And just to bring it back home, I really don't think there has been a more perfect marriage of composer and director than Hans Zimmer and Christopher Nolan. I'm trying to remember the last Nolan film without Zimmer's involvement, but his scores have been literally such a significant part of those films. I keep coming back to this term because it's true, but Zimmer's sound is every bit as integral to a Nolan film as his overly heady themes and plot twists.






    Posted September 9th by Jet Presto

    Now, Hans Zimmer scores are a dime a dozen, but John Williams stood the test of time.


    I mean, John Williams stood the test of time because he's so old and we can actually say that at this point. Hans Zimmer has already proven to stand the test of time, too. Dude has scored some all-time classic films, and easily has the most recognizable sound of any composer working today (er, it's kind of between him and Danny Elfman, really). I absolutely promise you that people will still be talking about Hans Zimmer 30 years from now, too. You don't have to create single iconic themes to stand out in the world of cinematic composing. Expecting every composer to create instantly iconic theme tracks is not reasonable, nor does it take into account the complex nature of cinema. You wouldn't use Zimmer on an adventure film like Indiana Jones, but you similarly can't just put John Williams on a Christopher Nolan film.

    Posted September 9th by Jet Presto

    As good as Zimmer is (and I don't see it myself), there are millions of replicas in film and TV that do not make me want him any more than what we have. Williams' scores put a lot of positive energy into the world. Even the worst scenes in movies feel better with his score. Zimmer, on the other hand, wants you to swim in an ocean of bleakness. The combination of Christopher Nolan and Hans Zimmer is not putting positive energy into the world. I have a friend and that's all he likes. But it all seems so superficial to me. Instead of having a normal story with ups and downs, you have a story that's constantly straining. So much so that viewers gawk at ANY sign of anything other than bleakness. No matter how good Zimmer is or gets in his life, his style is not something I'm interested in, and it's something the world has a surplus of.

    Some other film tracks I love:

    Main Theme - Coraline



    Not a single word of English was uttered in this! The track is a perfect blend of curiosity, fantasy, and the unnerving going-ons of a light stop-motion horror.

    Tai Lung Escapes - Kung Fu Panda



    On the topic of Zimmer, I personally love the side of Zimmer when he does try to be more emblematic. That's where you get stuff like Pirates of The Caribbean. For Kung Fu Panda, he worked with John Powell, and the two working together made something pretty incredible. You have the perfect mix of the right place in such a movie for Zimmer's classic starkness and modern moment-to-moment scoring, and he also takes a strong stance with the brass for this villain. The entire track is good, but the theme portion up to 2:30 is sheer brilliance. Why can't we get more of this from Zimmer?

    Entire Score for How to Train Your Dragon









    Jesus, John Powell is like a modern day John Williams who took a couple Zimmer classes. It's a shame he scored so many movies that didn't deserve him. But given the chance to do something right, damn does he do it right! Taking the best of Zimmer and Williams, Powell's scores combine motifs and themes and sweeping anthems and handles the action of scenes with not-often-used instruments (woodwinds in particular) with grace. Watch any scene in HTTYD and just focus on the interplay with music. Again, Powell often scores movies that definitely don't deserve him! HTTYD was not the greatest film ever, but the honesty and epic heights struck in his soundtrack would certainly have you guessing it was.

    PS, Hans Zimmer considers Powell to be his superior. After working together on Kung Fu Panda, Powell had his FIRST chance to compose music solo with HTTYD. He was snubbed the Oscar by The Social Network, a film whose soundtrack I forgot entirely. He really needs more chances like this with proper movies to really shine. Powell deserves an Oscar more than any other composer in Hollywood today.

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    Williams' scores put a lot of positive energy into the world. Even the worst scenes in movies feel better with his score. Zimmer, on the other hand, wants you to swim in an ocean of bleakness.


    This becomes stereotypical of you.

    Posted September 9th by Cruinn-Annuin

    Do you have anything to add to the discussion, or are you just here to troll/spam?

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    Nothing which I have not already said in different subjects. Though I can't be too harsh on you here, as you are owning your own opinion a lot more than usual.

    I don't mean what I said offensively; it's just not surprising that this kind of statement would be at the core of your preference.

    Edited September 9th by Cruinn-Annuin

    Williams' scores put a lot of positive energy into the world.


    Right, because he tends to score more upbeat action films. But also, we're not talking about "putting positive energy into the world." We're talking about art, and composition as it pertains to cinema. This is a totally fine reason to enjoy John Williams, especially more than Hans Zimmer, but it is also completely irrelevant to the conversation.

    The combination of Christopher Nolan and Hans Zimmer is not putting positive energy into the world.


    I mean, sure, Nolan isn't making films that are super happy and upbeat (and thank god because as much as I like those films, that is just artistically boring to have all the time). That said, I absolutely think Nolan is having a positive impact on mainstream film making. If making complex films that do interesting stuff and tackle complex themes (even if not always done well) is a "negative," then I just wonder what you think even is the purpose of art. If anything, Nolan has done enough to show Hollywood studios that there is a mainstream market for films that serve to challenge its viewers. That is the complete opposite side of the Michael Bay/Transformers coin here. I think that is such an important thing, personally. (I also would argue that despite the bleakness of Nolan's movies, he generally doesn't stray too far into the world of cynicism. The entire purpose of Interstellar was about the value of love and that love is the only thing that transcends time and space. They literally save the human race because of a father's love of his daughter. And for as bleak as The Dark Knight got, he made it a point to show a *prisoner* decide to step up and get rid of the detonator so the boat with the women and children could survive. Yes, Nolan movies get visually dark. Yes, they can get bleak. But what I find most compelling about Nolan films is that he doesn't often veer too far to one side.

    So yeah, I would absolutely argue that Christopher Nolan has put positive energy out into the world, not that that should be a stipulation of "good art." He just doesn't do a one-note, upbeat only thing, because he knows that generally makes for boring cinema.


    As for Hans Zimmer, this dude has scored a LOT of movies, including The Lion King, The Prince of Egypt, and The Simpsons Movie. Dude has created plenty of uplifting tracks, including from Interstellar, Man of Steel, and the Dark Knight. Personally, my favorite aspect of his Dark Knight score is the way he incorporates an empowering tone in tracks so that for as dark as the score and film get, there is always the feeling that good things will rise from the ashes.

    And again, we *cannot* look at these scores outside the context of their respective films.


    PS, Hans Zimmer considers Powell to be his superior.


    So, this is the thing: I'm not making any comments about one being "superior" to the other. My arguments are not - even slightly - about Hans Zimmer being "superior" to John Williams or anyone else for that matter. I'm not even arguing one is my favorite (to be honest, neither is my favorite film composer). You will note that I have not at any point put John Williams' work down. I've argued his work fits a particular genre of film a lot better, and that he might take different approaches to scoring, but I have never in the course of this conversation suggested what he does is wrong or bad. You, on the other hand, do not appear willing - at all - to accept different artistic approaches to anything other than the ONE singular idea that you prefer. In your world, there appears no room for diversity in artistic stylings. And it is just fundamentally flawed to look at these different approaches and styles and determine that one is superior to the other, especially when you're lifting music out of the context of their respective films. John Powell's score for How To Train Your Dragon is excellent, and it works extremely well for an all-ages, animated film. You do not want to incorporate that into the world of a Nolan film, or a Mad Max film, or a Zack Snyder film. You *cannot* strip the context of the films from these musical pieces to make comments about who is a better composer.

    Posted September 9th by Jet Presto

    Right, because he tends to score more upbeat action films.

    Not sure if I'd call Schindler's List upbeat. It's William's score that makes those films feel greater than life.

    (I also would argue that despite the bleakness of Nolan's movies, he generally doesn't stray too far into the world of cynicism.

    You kidding? Memento? Inception? And yes, The Dark Knight? Nolan is very cynical. When Zimmer worked together with John Powell on Kung Fu Panda, he scored the scene where we meet the villain locked in an impenetrable prison, escapes, and takes down everyone. Powell, on the other hand, scored the gorgeous scene where Master Oogway ascends. Zimmer recommended Powell score his own film. The following movie Powell scored solo was How To Train Your Dragon, arguably one of the greatest scores of all time.

    And for as bleak as The Dark Knight got, he made it a point to show a *prisoner* decide to step up and get rid of the detonator so the boat with the women and children could survive. Yes, Nolan movies get visually dark. Yes, they can get bleak. But what I find most compelling about Nolan films is that he doesn't often veer too far to one side.

    Just because someone at the last minute decides to throw in a happy ending doesn't mean the entire rest of the movie is suddenly bright and cheery sunshine and smiles. Nolan's movies are biased towards the dark, bleaker side of humanity, and they stay there. Contrast with Steven Spielburg's Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom which spans the gamut.

    He just doesn't do a one-note, upbeat only thing, because he knows that generally makes for boring cinema.

    See? This right here is what's wrong with a lot of people's mentality. Nolan is not bleak because in the last second someone throws the detonator overboard, even though the entire rest of the film is bleak as all hell, but when I ask for filmmakers to not be so distraught suddenly it's like I'm asking them to make pink fluffy unicorns bouncing on rainbows. That's the definition of a Strawman fallacy.

    Finding Nemo expressed a better range of emotion. Similar holds true of Speilburg.

    You, on the other hand, do not appear willing - at all - to accept different artistic approaches to anything other than the ONE singular idea that you prefer. In your world, there appears no room for diversity in artistic stylings.

    Sorry for demanding films scores feel something other than generic droning about the bleakness and hopelessness of humanity. If anything, that is one-note.

    John Powell's score for How To Train Your Dragon is excellent, and it works extremely well for an all-ages, animated film. You do not want to incorporate that into the world of a Nolan film, or a Mad Max film, or a Zack Snyder film. You *cannot* strip the context of the films from these musical pieces to make comments about who is a better composer.

    I'm just tired of it. Making an entire movie melodramatic and giving it a small happy ending can only be tried so much before it becomes tiresome. If Zimmer was actually capable of something like Powell, or Williams, or Danny Elfman, or Michael Giaccino I might consider him more than a one-note composer. But I truly believe Zimmer encapsulates the dark parts of Hollywood better than any other composer, and while those composers can score dark things, they can also score much more positive and uplifting things and cover a gamut. Toy Story 3 was scored by Randy Newman, ALL of it! From singing the folksy song "You got a friend in me" to the dramatic hair-raising incinerator scene. Every single composer I lifted demonstrated this kind of capacity. Giaccino scored "Operation Market Garden" for Medal of Honor, "Married Life" for Up, and "Glory Days" for The Incredibles. Elfman made Batman's theme (for BTAS), the Simpson's theme, and all the music for The Nightmare Before Christmas. But Zimmer is only good at one thing, one kind of movie that Hollywood keeps demanding: darkness, bleakness, cynicism, grotesque violence, and maybe the rare moment of something neutral happening. But you can't go to Zimmer expecting a grand, epic score. All of The Lion King's songs were written/performed by Elton John/Bernie Taupin and Tim Rice. Zimmer's score doesn't even kick in until Simba goes back to the pride lands and finds out it's blight as a result of Scar's dictatorship. And then when the film gets happy again, Zimmer is nowhere to be found.

    Zimmer is only capable of one thing. He can never handle an entire movie's score alone unless it's a Nolan flick or something bleak like what modern Hollywood is craving for right now. Movies should have more range than this, but they don't. For a one-note film that occasionally has a neutral moment, Zimmer is perfect. For everything else, Zimmer is crippled.

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    Not sure if I'd call Schindler's List upbeat.


    I said he tends to score upbeat action-adventure films. That has generally been his bread and butter for decades. All of these composers have range and have done more than one thing, obviously.


    You kidding? Memento? Inception? And yes, The Dark Knight? Nolan is very cynical.


    Again, I said generally, not always. And no, examining darker corners of human nature does not inherently make one "cynical."


    Just because someone at the last minute decides to throw in a happy ending doesn't mean the entire rest of the movie is suddenly bright and cheery sunshine and smiles.


    I didn't say that it made it bright and upbeat. I just said that he does put some positive energy in his work because Nolan, when you *actually* watch the *entire* film and examine the whole piece of fiction, explores multiple themes and elements. The Dark Knight is not a film that conveys just one thing. It does not tell us that humans are fundamentally bad. Nor does it tell us that we are fundamentally good. It shows us that we are fundamentally complex, which is true. He shows that we have the capacity for bad (evident by the people trying to appease the Joker and turn in that dude he asks for), but also indicates that we have the capacity for good (as indicated by the protagonists of the film that save the day at great personal cost).

    The same thing is true of Interstellar, especially. Man destroyed the world, essentially. That is the set-up of the film. But the entire film is about coming to understand that humans have the capacity to love, and that love transcends space and time and it is love that ultimately saved humankind as a species. Yes, the world is bleak in the set-up (Nolan does tend to pull from real world events frequently enough), but if your takeaway from Interstellar is that Nolan is cynical, I think maybe you just don't complex narrative fiction or care too much to actually watch for subtext.

    Nolan is not bleak because in the last second someone throws the detonator overboard, even though the entire rest of the film is bleak as all hell


    The rest of his films are usually not "bleak as hell." But even if the worlds are, he is using that as set-up to explore complex themes. Again, if you think the only moment of positive perspective is someone throws a detonator overboard, you may be missing the entire context for the film, and ignoring many of the themes he explores within them.


    but when I ask for filmmakers to not be so distraught suddenly it's like I'm asking them to make pink fluffy unicorns bouncing on rainbows. That's the definition of a Strawman fallacy.


    No, but you continue to ignore the complexity of most Nolan films, and the themes he frequently explores in them. You seem incapable or unwilling to recognize the subtext of his work, or the function of certain elements of it.


    Contrast with Steven Spielburg's Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom which spans the gamut.


    I generally like Spielberg, but Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is a totally garbage film. I'm not sure that is a good example to use for anything.


    Sorry for demanding films scores feel something other than generic droning about the bleakness and hopelessness of humanity. If anything, that is one-note.


    I *literally* just finished explaining why I think Zimmer's scores are able to cover so much more than just the bleakness and hopelessness of humanity (which isn't even a thing I wind up feeling listening to his music either way). You could at least pretend to act like you are sort of at least listening to me. This argument of yours is essentially just sticking your fingers in your ears going, "NO IT ISN'T!"


    But you can't go to Zimmer expecting a grand, epic score.


    He's given me plenty of grand and epic scores. It is different from John Williams and John Powell and other composers as well. I know you don't agree, but I have found no shortage of epic sounds coming from Zimmer, that again, go well beyond just "bleakness." Maybe it says something about you that you can only hear bleakness from his music, regardless of its actual sound or context in a film, where others hear more?

    Movies should have more range than this


    They do. It seems like maybe you just don't like movies that demand a bit more work from the viewer to understand the themes and subtext?

    Posted September 9th by Jet Presto

    I said he tends to score upbeat action-adventure films. That has generally been his bread and butter for decades. All of these composers have range and have done more than one thing, obviously.

    Mmm... Can't say so for Zimmer. Every project that wasn't cynical had the non-cynical parts handled by a different composer.

    Again, I said generally, not always. And no, examining darker corners of human nature does not inherently make one "cynical."

    Closer to cynical than ideal. Why not examine both?

    I didn't say that it made it bright and upbeat. I just said that he does put some positive energy in his work because Nolan, when you *actually* watch the *entire* film and examine the whole piece of fiction, explores multiple themes and elements.

    I have watched several Nolan films. Maybe if I was younger I'd call myself a fan, but the bleakness grows tiresome. You can't tell me his films are complex, therefore fulfilling when they're so obviously biased towards the melodramatic depressive side. Batman: The Animates Series had a far, vastly greater range than what Nolan wanted to show.

    He shows that we have the capacity for bad (evident by the people trying to appease the Joker and turn in that dude he asks for), but also indicates that we have the capacity for good (as indicated by the protagonists of the film that save the day at great personal cost).

    Here's the problem: the bad stuff makes the world worse, but the good stuff also makes people's lives miserable. There is never, EVER a moment of bliss in a Nolan film. There is never a moment of pure joy, happiness, contentedness. There's always some conflict, some problems, some grinding gears where things aren't going great and aren't going to get better anytime soon for the ENTIRE movie. Contrast that with movies that actually have ups AND downs. My problem isn't just the bleakness, but how much the dial is stuck there. It's possible to go far more bleak than Nolan and bounce out of it, but Nolan likes to keep the dial on a certain setting and keep it there for the entire movie. And Zimmer is very comfortable when that dial doesn't move, so the two together make a great team producing mildly bleak movies decade after decade.

    I generally like Spielberg, but Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is a totally garbage film. I'm not sure that is a good example to use for anything.

    Raiders of the Lost Ark? ET?

    I *literally* just finished explaining why I think Zimmer's scores are able to cover so much more than just the bleakness and hopelessness of humanity (which isn't even a thing I wind up feeling listening to his music either way). You could at least pretend to act like you are sort of at least listening to me. This argument of yours is essentially just sticking your fingers in your ears going, "NO IT ISN'T!"

    The problem is I watched these films, and I don't see what you're seeing. There's happiness in The Dark Knight? Batman: The Animated Series had Bruce Wayne get married and find actual happiness in his life where he might actually be able to leave Batman behind. Nolan wouldn't do that, and Zimmer couldn't score that.

    Maybe it says something about you that you can only hear bleakness from his music, regardless of its actual sound or context in a film, where others hear more?

    Helping people should feel good. In Nolan's films no good deed goes unpunished. Happiness is nowhere to be found, and Zimmer makes sure you know that. After watching Memento, Inception, and The Dark Knight, I assure you that is the case. Why are children the only ones allowed to be happy? Actually happy?

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    You can't tell me his films are complex, therefore fulfilling when they're so obviously biased towards the melodramatic depressive side.


    Jesus Christ, my dude. You're like a little kid that only knows that the stove is hot and that candy is sweet.

    Posted September 9th by Cruinn-Annuin

    Jesus Christ, my dude. You're like a little kid that only knows that the stove is hot and that candy is sweet.

    OK, name ONE happy scene in The Dark Knight, or Memento, or Inception. One scene that is unequivocally happy without any other conflict impeding on it. Bonus points if Zimmer's score is also ACTUALLY happy without the droning conflicting feelings of misery and despair. You have the option of proving me wrong, but until you actually take it you're just in denial.

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    BTW, it is VERY rare for a movie to be scored by more than one composer. However, this happens a lot for Zimmer because he just can't write happy music for happy scenes on his own. That's not his shtick, he's just not good with it.

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    OK, name ONE happy scene in The Dark Knight, or Memento, or Inception. One scene that is unequivocally happy without any other conflict impeding on it. Bonus points if Zimmer's score is also ACTUALLY happy without the droning conflicting feelings of misery and despair. You have the option of proving me wrong, but until you actually take it you're just in denial.


    How would that be relevant at all?

    You're like one of those people that asks me how anyone can enjoy listening to super disturbing metal all the time. Fulfillment, affirmation and resolution do not only happen within the borders of happiness.

    Posted September 9th by Cruinn-Annuin

    "However, this happens a lot for Zimmer because he just can't write happy music for happy scenes on his own."

    Pirates of the Carribean's score is pretty upbeat and playful.

    Posted September 9th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    How would that be relevant at all?

    I said Nolan's movies are depressing. You're saying they're not. I'm saying to point one scene that is happy and you can't. If the topic of the conversation is irrelevant to you, then why are you even posting, here? Every second you don't prove yourself is just another second where you're wasting everybody's time. You hate my stance, but my stance is correct. Nolan's movies are biased towards the cynical, the bleak, the hopelessness and constant misery. Nolan avoids pure happiness, bliss, and content as much as Zimmer does, to the point where he is literally incapacitated to do anything else about it.

    I haven't seen Interstellar, so maybe there's a film that shows Nolan has range, but from what I've seen of his work I just haven't seen that range at all. Same goes for Zimmer, who's very good at one particular thing and nothing else.

    Pirates of the Carribean's score is pretty upbeat and playful.

    Mmm... I was thinking about that. It's adventurous, but of all the adventurous themes of the era it's definitely the most cynical. Like I said, Danny Elfman did everything from Batman to The Nightmare Before Christmas and the Simpsons' theme song. Giacchino did everything from Medal of Honor to The Incredibles, Up, and Ratatouille, without need for a crutch. But Zimmer has never scored something actually happy and not cynical in his entire life and constantly had to rely on others for films like The Lion King and Kung Fu Panda. Once he handles a movie like that well, I might consider on level playing ground with literally every other composer in Hollywood that is fully capable of handling a broader range. Until he does so, all my points stand. Zimmer is good, but only as a specialist. He's crippled, otherwise.

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    I said Nolan's movies are depressing. You're saying they're not.


    No. Once again, you're completely missing the point. Don't try to put words in my mouth.

    You hate my stance, but my stance is correct.




    Posted September 9th by Cruinn-Annuin

    How are POTC's themes cynical?

    I think you're talking out your ass.

    Posted September 9th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Talking out your ass

    when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object


    I love red leaf

    Posted September 9th by S.o.h.
    S.o.h.
     



    Edited September 9th by KnokkelMillennium

    Until someone can name a scene in a Christopher Nolan movie that is actually happy, he is incapable. Until someone can name a song Hans Zimmer made that is actually happy, he is incapable. I don't like these movies because they are never happy, and I don't like films that are bleak all the time. I'm done with excuses! "Oh, well, Jack Sparrow is a trickster and is more jovial than everyone trying to kill him and he gets away in the end, therefore..."

    No. Just, no. Jack Sparrow smiling at the Navy who wants to hang him and Barbossa who wants to kill him does not suddenly make the movie happy for me. Christopher Nolan is incapable of range, neither is Zimmer. Until I see proof otherwise, this stands.

    Posted September 9th by mariomguy

    But Zimmer has never scored something actually happy and not cynical in his entire life and constantly had to rely on others for films like The Lion King and Kung Fu Panda. Once he handles a movie like that well, I might consider on level playing ground with literally every other composer in Hollywood that is fully capable of handling a broader range. Until he does so, all my points stand. Zimmer is good, but only as a specialist. He's crippled, otherwise.


    I beg to differ. He can very clearly do upbeat and cheerful music. For example this track from PotC 2: Dead Man's Chest has no negative feels that I can get from it:



    If he can create a single track, or even just long moments of tracks (like Jack Sparrow), then he can do it as many times as a film needs. I think it's likely just a case of he prefers a certain style and sticks to it which is why you don't really see him composing for 100% happy all the time movies. He also scores very well for what is happening within a scene. If a scene takes a darker turn, then so does the track he has composed, if the scene gets happier then so does his music. This can all happen within one track.

    Someone like Danny Elfman or John Williams, meanwhile, I often find they just produce music that works for a scene but isn't necessarily as closely tied to what is going on. Like they'll make the music work for an action scene, or work for an emotional scene, etc, but they aren't so tied to a scene that you couldn't just transplant them into another movie and most people will never notice (funny thing is Williams actually did this with Harry Potter, there is literally a moment in Harry Potter where some Star Wars music from Attack of the Clones plays and no one feels it is out of place. Only those who are losers like me even noticed that it happened).

    Whereas if you took some of Zimmer's tracks from something like PotC, it wouldn't work because he's tied sections of the tracks to specific moments in the movie. That is why you feel that even his upbeat tracks have moments of "cynicism" or "depression".

    This isn't to say other composers don't, they have to as part of their craft. There are certainly moments in their soundtracks where a track will go up and down as required, but Zimmer, I feel, crafts his tracks around scenes very closely.

    So yea, I don't feel it's a lack of skill on Zimmer's part. It is likely a lack of interest.

    Posted September 9th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    Love you too SOH. :P

    Posted September 9th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    If he can create a single track, or even just long moments of tracks (like Jack Sparrow), then he can do it as many times as a film needs. I think it's likely just a case of he prefers a certain style and sticks to it which is why you don't really see him composing for 100% happy all the time movies. He also scores very well for what is happening within a scene. If a scene takes a darker turn, then so does the track he has composed, if the scene gets happier then so does his music. This can all happen within one track.

    Even this one example does not remove all the other examples where he scored the bleaker scenes of collaborative movies. Even if it is preference, my original argument was that I didn't like him because of optics, and this is true: most of his projects are not jovial. There is certainly preference involved, and that preference is enough. Even if a couple times he made a track that was upbeat.

    Also, I swear this sounds like the song that would play in a pub.

    Someone like Danny Elfman or John Williams, meanwhile, I often find they just produce music that works for a scene but isn't necessarily as closely tied to what is going on.

    Yeah. It's a long thread, but this has been established. I like the emblematic stuff: you hear a riff from Star Wars' main theme and what you're watching is unmistakable. I'd argue Zimmer's scores can work in other films if the beats and movements of the music are timed right. And other composers found ways to balance emblems with moment-to-moment matching, like David Arnold's scores for James Bond, particularly Casino Royale.

    Whereas if you took some of Zimmer's tracks from something like PotC, it wouldn't work because he's tied sections of the tracks to specific moments in the movie. That is why you feel that even his upbeat tracks have moments of "cynicism" or "depression".

    Or his tracks are used for irony, like how Jack smiles when being confronted by the British Royal Navy, a jovial track might be used in a pub where everyone's getting drunk. I really do miss scoring emblems at face value. Say what you will about complexity, but complexity didn't give us Jurassic Park's main theme or the music in Star Wars. And I prefer the movie to actually have this range embedded into the story, not just play a different soundtrack to horrible going-ons in an "attempt" to lift spirits. The characters should be on a journey: if they're not, then the movie grows stale.

    Posted September 10th by mariomguy

    Closer to cynical than ideal. Why not examine both?


    Because Nolan likes complexity and generally focusing on themes that intersect with each other. See, you keep trying to hyper-simplify everything as if movies exist in either two worlds: cynical or ideal. But they don't. Most of Nolan's work exists as these complex, complicated, messy, (often too heavy-handed, honestly) thematic pieces in which the objective is to neither come off as super cynical (like Zack Snyder) or too idyllic. He does examine the good and the bad. The Batman trilogy is *literally* about heroes standing up and rising out of the darkness. That's *literally* what that trilogy is about.


    You can't tell me his films are complex, therefore fulfilling when they're so obviously biased towards the melodramatic depressive side.


    I can very much tell you that, because they are. Just because you don't understand film doesn't mean that those films are somehow devoid of the complexities of themes and focuses. And I never said those movies were "fulfilling." They're not really supposed to be that. Because Nolan is not interested in telling stereotypical Hollywood blockbuster fare. He is always interested in exploring themes that challenge a mainstream audience more than pretty much any director that gets mainstream work. Movies don't have to leave us "fulfilled."


    There's always some conflict, some problems, some grinding gears where things aren't going great and aren't going to get better anytime soon for the ENTIRE movie.


    Man, I can only imagine what your feelings on Shakespeare must be...

    But also, I mean, yeah. Nolan is constantly examining current issues within his works. He uses his films to tackle themes present in the modern real world. Things aren't going to end super cleanly because that's not how it works. It also betrays the function of his films to do that kind of thing. If his objective is to challenge viewers to decide for themselves what is right or acceptable, then he can't put a nice little bow on anything because that tells the audience what to think about a particular side of the issue.


    The problem is I watched these films, and I don't see what you're seeing.


    Well sure, you have a very simple understanding of cinema, and have an extremely strict set of standards for everything to abide by in order for you to respect something. I have a bit more cinematic literacy and can see deeper into the subtext of films. And I also, ya know, like to like things, so I don't completely dismiss a film because it didn't do what *I* prefer. I take a piece of fiction for what it is and what it is trying to do. You will never see what I see in any film because you just don't want to.


    There's happiness in The Dark Knight?


    Literally not what I said. (But for whatever it's worth, there is happiness in The Dark Knight Rises.) Nolan is rarely interested in tackling anything, even emotions, as simple as "sadness" or "happiness." And that is absolutely fine. Not everything has to have happiness or joy. Not every piece of cinema has to cover every single emotional beat.


    Batman: The Animated Series had Bruce Wayne get married and find actual happiness in his life where he might actually be able to leave Batman behind. Nolan wouldn't do that


    Yeah, because Nolan is making a 2 (2.5) hour film, and the whole "giving up being a superhero" thing was already popularly covered previously by Sam Raimi. Generally speaking, when you're making a single movie about Batman, it's sort of counter-intuitive to make the entire film be where Bruce Wayne gives up being Batman. But also, it literally doesn't make sense for him to tackle in The Dark Knight because the entire point of those first two movies was to depict early-stage Batman. You canNOT tell that story for a Bruce Wayne only a year or two into being Batman. It does not work. You have to establish Batman, and why him giving up the mantle would be such a big fucking deal in the first place.

    But also, Nolan DID make that movie. The Dark Knight Rises shows how he gave up being Batman because he was brooding too much over Rachel's death at the start of the film, and ends with him giving up being Batman to be with Selina and appearing to be kind of actually happy for the first time since he was a child with his parents by the end. That's the entire flippin' arc of Bruce Wayne in the trilogy.


    I said Nolan's movies are depressing. You're saying they're not.


    LITERALLY NO ONE HAS SAID THAT.


    I'm saying to point one scene that is happy and you can't.


    How are you defining happiness, first off? Second off, this is still besides the point. It is absolutely fine to depict non-simplified versions of joy or pleasure. And when tackling complex real world issues, happiness is not the point and focusing too much on wrapping things up with a happy little bow contradicts the function of his films.


    Once he handles a movie like that well, I might consider on level playing ground with literally every other composer in Hollywood that is fully capable of handling a broader range.


    Read: "until he does what *I* want him to do, rather than according to what the filmmakers and artists are going for and trying to do, I will continue to shit on him."

    Until someone can name a scene in a Christopher Nolan movie that is actually happy, he is incapable


    Or, alternatively, as an artist, Christopher Nolan is interested in themes and styles that you are not. Doesn't mean he's "incapable." Just means he is doing what he finds interesting (as well as many others, given his success).


    Nolan avoids pure happiness, bliss, and content


    So did Shakespeare. But also, good! When Hollywood has long been obsessed with the happy ending and ensuring only good things happen to good characters, it's refreshing to have a filmmaker in the mainstream who is unconcerned about falling into the same tropes and patterns. And sure, Nolan has wound up with a large enough body of work that he has his own, but it's different than most other things out there being pushed by Hollywood studios. Bliss is boring, dude. Especially when you're making thematic, thinky, real-world grounded dramas. (Like, remember that: we're talking about a guy making dramas, not adventure films or family films.)

    You hate my stance, but my stance is correct.


    THAT'S NOT HOW FUCKING ART WORKS, MY DUDE.

    Mmm... I was thinking about that. It's adventurous, but of all the adventurous themes of the era it's definitely the most cynical.


    What does that even mean???


    Raiders of the Lost Ark? ET?


    (Ok, so if we want to get into this one: my hot take is that every Indiana Jones movie is kiiiiind of garbage... I think for me, a lot of it has to do with how much the titular character just fucking sucks. But I also don't think those movies are all that sophisticated, complex, or all that fun. They do action sequences well, so it's eye-candy, but I've personally never felt anything about it because nothing about the action feels compelling or meaningful. So, that's my controversial opinion in the thread.)

    Posted September 10th by Jet Presto

    Until someone can name a song Hans Zimmer made that is actually happy, he is incapable.

    Even this one example does not remove all the other examples where he scored the bleaker scenes of collaborative movies.


    I mean... I did what you asked and you just moved the line. How can anyone convince you of anything if you do that?

    Even if it is preference, my original argument was that I didn't like him because of optics, and this is true: most of his projects are not jovial. There is certainly preference involved, and that preference is enough. Even if a couple times he made a track that was upbeat.


    Ok but I was replying to your claim that he was able to do it. Regardless of what your original argument was you still made the outlandish claim that he can't do cheerful.

    Posted September 10th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    i feel bad for mariomguy he always seems to get attacked for expressing unpopular opinions

    Posted September 10th by 60b
    60b
     

    Its fine to express them. But he'll go on and on about them and he seems to have no sense of humor or chill either.

    Posted September 10th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    that doesn't mean people should attack him, it's one thing to say "you're wrong" but some stoop down much lower than him.

    Posted September 10th by 60b
    60b
     



    Edited September 10th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    Ok, would ideally like to keep this thread focused on scores and soundtracks. If we're at the point where the conversation can't continue without attacking or defending individuals, maybe we can just talk about what it is we like about some of the scores that we do.

    Posted September 10th by Jet Presto

    And I'm struck by the importance of, say, Hans Zimmer's score in Christopher Nolan's "Dunkirk."


    Yea I mean. That is one soundtrack that I don't enjoy outside of the film (whereas i lot of Zimmer's stuff I can actually listen to on its own) but damn it's so perfectly fit for the film. I remember a couple of tense scenes actually felt really tense because the music was building you to that emotionally and that's really stuck with me from the film.

    (creating the first and, thus far, only real memorable character theme in any superhero film of the modern era)


    What are we considering the modern era? The first Thor film actually did a good job of trying to establish a theme for Thor himself, you can hear a more somber variant of it towards the end of the track where he gets banished (around 1:17 it kicks in):



    It is used in various points throughout the movie and usually more upbeat that than but I was too lazy to find those bits (actually I just noticed Jet posted Sons of Odin which has it and as I recall that particular scene was focused around the Thor ceremony at the start, so the name of the track is partially misleading). I only recall it ever being used when focused around Thor himself so I always associated it as his theme. Unfortunately it didn't survive into Avengers or Thor 2, much to my disappointment.

    BUT they brought this theme back very briefly and somewhat more subtle in Ragnarok for a specific Thor moment (I think I commented on it when we all discussed that film) but sadly I can't remember which moment it was or find it in the vast soundtrack. I would have to rewatch the movie to find the exact moment.

    ________________________________________________________________

    I'm a sucker for character themes in stuff, especially the super hero stuff because they're usually some of the more creative character themes. So I've been really disappointed by the absence of any in the Marvel movies. I mean if they all had a theme established in their initial movies, you could have these cool moments in Avengers movies where they blend it together.

    The Arrowverse shows have done this very successfully and for me it helps build the excitement of a scene just as much as actually seeing the heroes from the different shows fighting each other.

    I also love when it is creatively used for villains. Like a scene where you don't quite know who is there, then their theme plays just before the visual reveal and there's something oddly rewarding about that. I guess the brain feels like "oh I got it from the audio before you showed me it" or something.

    ________________________________________________________________

    I definitely wouldn't say that modern films have bad music, but then I wouldn't say it's every been bad. I've been buying soundtracks since I was earning money (over a decade now) and that has included stuff that was modern within that time frame plus stuff from years before. So I personally don't think there's been a drop in quality. The style has changed at times as different composers have come and gone from different genres, but I don't really think I could say it was always for better or for worse. Just different.

    I guess if people were focusing on superhero movies they could get a bit of fatigue for the particular style a lot of them have gone for. Like, I don't feel the Thor 2 soundtrack is anywhere near as Thor 1 because Thor 1 tried to differentiate itself (probably due to its Norse and Spacey themes) while Thor 2 a lot of it came over as more generic superhero music. I'm not even sure I remember much of any music from the Captain America movies that made me want to buy the soundtracks for those either. But then we've had other standouts, which brings me back to it's never been overall bad. There's just the usual ups and downs as some movies just make an ok soundtrack and others make ones that I really want to listen to. (Or in the case of Dunkirk, just really enhanced the movie).

    Posted September 10th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    I also feel like there are bad cases of character themes. Take Poppy's theme from Kingsmen 2:



    As a theme it's actually very fitting for the character and I've listened to it many times because I find it good music. It has a slow methodical feel to it initially which fits with her character, it even has a menace to it in some of the slow parts which again fits her well. Then there's the big epic part which I suppose fits how hard she hits when she enacts her plan, but this is where I feel the theme doesn't work within the movie itself. It feels so out of place when it is used. If it had been kept to the slower more menacing parts then it would have been perfect, but those bombastic parts just sort of drew me out of the scenes a little bit.

    They were used appropriately I suppose, such as when the robot dogs are attacking or whatever, but it was too over the top (even for a movie that itself is over the top :P).

    Edited September 10th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    I want to make a thread about video game scores. But I'd rather just have this thread include them.

    Posted September 10th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    I also really don't like it when movies use licensed music (did Suicide Squad have anything but that?). I think this is probably just a personal thing but I would much rather hear what a composer can come up with than hear some stupid track from a currently famous singer or whatever it is they use.

    Posted September 10th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    Also some tracks that I really like for various reasons that haven't already been posted:

    Catwoman's theme


    Batman theme (that Jet mentioned)


    Modern Star Wars has a severe lack of interesting tracks imo, but Williams did a great job on Rey's theme:


    Couldn't mention Star Wars without the Force Theme:


    Also the Han and Leia theme:


    I could go on for a while with Star Wars so I'll leave it at those and just end of the god damned Avengers theme which I love so much. Marvel may have disappointed with character themes but they got a great theme for their team up:


    Edited September 10th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    The first Thor film actually did a good job of trying to establish a theme for Thor himself


    In as much as it is there, yeah. I'm not saying the scores were *bad.* Just that they were very much designed to be sort of generic or safe. Music in Marvel films were largely expected to just be in the background. Thor has a theme. So does Captain America. So does Iron Man. So does Ant-Man. These characters do all have themes (as these composers are good and know what they're doing), and they work themselves into the rest of the score at times. True.

    But I'm talking about distinct character themes that are instantaneously recognizable. Like, you hear this:



    There is virtually no doubt right away that they have re-incorporated the classic, iconic Spider-man theme into this track. You hear it and you instantly recognize it. You hear even the first two seconds and your brain just recognizes what is coming.

    Thor's theme doesn't really sound like anything distinguishable, really. There are some interesting ways Marvel movies got around this: largely by focusing more on a type of sound rather than a melody or piece of composition itself, you can generally get a sense of who is about to show up. Hear some electric guitars? It's probably going to be Iron Man. Hear some heavy drums and a baritone horn sound? It's probably Captain America. Hear a bit more strings, and it's probably Thor. But right now, can you just hear Thor's theme in your head? (I can sort of picture the Avengers theme, and that is easily Marvel's most recognizable anthem at the moment.) (Side note: I'm not saying it's not a great anthem, just that it lacks the kind of memorability that, say, John Williams created for Superman or Danny Elfman did for Batman

    Meanwhile, I hear a single second of this, I know who it is.



    I can hear that guitar riff in my head. And it's completely distinguishable from any other character in the films. Not sure there is anyone in the Marvel repertoire whose theme I can hear in my brain. I can hear Black Panther's, because it is arguably the most distinct of any character's. I can hear the guitars in Iron Man's, but can't think of the melody. Definitely can't think of Thor's or Cap's, though I can think of the instrumentation.



    I should also just state how much I really love the title music for the first Sam Raimi Spider-man film. It's so great, but I also have a ton of nostalgia for it. I can never really remember how it goes, but I know it when I hear it.





    Posted September 10th by Jet Presto

    See, you keep trying to hyper-simplify everything as if movies exist in either two worlds: cynical or ideal. But they don't. Most of Nolan's work exists as these complex, complicated, messy, (often too heavy-handed, honestly) thematic pieces in which the objective is to neither come off as super cynical (like Zack Snyder) or too idyllic.

    Ok, I don't like complicated depressing shit. Maybe you find great joy sitting through 3 hours of people being miserable and difficult, but that's not for me.

    Movies don't have to leave us "fulfilled."

    Paying money for unsatisfactory work is not interesting to me.

    How are you defining happiness, first off?



    Well sure, you have a very simple understanding of cinema, and have an extremely strict set of standards for everything to abide by in order for you to respect something.

    Things I require:

  • Main character goes on some kind of journey of self-improvement or realization (The Incredibles).
  • Range of emotions and choices where consequences follow.
  • Story cues expressed clearly, cleanly, and distinctly keeping in mind all the elements of cinema (dialogue, staging, camera movement, stage direction, etc).

    Thinks I strongly recommend:

  • Likable characters that have room for improvement.
  • Slick editing fit throughout.
  • Good, original music befitting the themes and emotions. Sound distinct to the film/series is a big plus.
  • Some form of decency and/or self-control (Human Centipede is a no, but Godfather is a yes).
  • Writing that builds on its ideas and develops over time (Amelie, Misery)

    Things I like to have (purely opinionated):

  • Using characters, visuals, themes, motifs, etc. for symbolism or real world analogs/corollaries (Shrek, Zootopia, Spirited Away)
  • Also, in a world of talking animals, the species carry symbolic significance (This rarely happens)
  • Witty dialogue and writing (Pulp Fiction, My Big Fat Greek Wedding)
  • Happy, though unexpected ending (Toy Story 3, Citizen Kane)
  • A fantastic world to live and breathe in (Wall-e, Spirited Away, The Lord of The Rings)
  • FUN (Singin' In The Rain, Goodfellas)

    Things I hate:

  • Betraying your audience (Man of Steel)
  • Leaving the dial stuck on "generic melodrama" (Zach Snyder films, a lot of modern Hollywood)
  • Forgot to make me care for the characters, but assume I already do (a lot of Marvel films).
  • Unclear story cues/pedestrian editing (The American)
  • A story that takes a wrong turn and veers off (Wall-e)
  • Cringe (any show that feels like it was obviously made for children)
  • Plot holes you can drive trucks through (Frozen)

  • Posted September 10th by mariomguy

    Things I require:

    Main character goes on some kind of journey of self-improvement or realization (The Incredibles).
    Range of emotions and choices where consequences follow.
    Story cues expressed clearly, cleanly, and distinctly keeping in mind all the elements of cinema (dialogue, staging, camera movement, stage direction, etc).


    The Dark Knight trilogy literally fits that bill. It doesn't hit ALL the emotional beats that you want to see a film hit, but it has a main character that goes on some kind of journey of self-improvement or realization. It depicts a wide range of emotions throughout the trilogy, and choices that definitely have consequences. And the story cues are definitely expressed clearly, cleanly, and absolutely utilizes the elements of cinema like dialogue, staging, camera movement, and stage direction (I mean, the opening seven minutes of The Dark Knight is just supreme filmmaking, really.)

    Thinks I strongly recommend:

    Likable characters that have room for improvement.
    Slick editing fit throughout.
    Good, original music befitting the themes and emotions. Sound distinct to the film/series is a big plus.
    Some form of decency and/or self-control (Human Centipede is a no, but Godfather is a yes).
    Writing that builds on its ideas and develops over time (Amelie, Misery)


    Yeah, and I think that the Dark Knight trilogy, as well as Interstellar and The Prestige, have that. But I also think "decency" fundamentally depends on the subject or themes expressed.

    (Also, literally all of this stuff is "opinionated.")

    Betraying your audience (Man of Steel)


    Ah, see, I don't feel like Man of Steel betrayed the audience. Maybe it is because I'm a little bit of an aficionado, but I knew exactly what I was getting myself into with Zack Snyder directing a Superman movie. I felt the movie betrayed the character, but as an audience member, I kinda felt like he gave me exactly what I expected. Hard to feel betrayed when that is the case. I am curious what you mean by that.


    A story that takes a wrong turn and veers off (Wall-e)


    I assume you are referring to the human plot thread. If so, I recognize that this is a fairly common criticism of the film, but I actually found it to be essential. I kinda feel like Wall-E actually doesn't work as a feature film without it. Like, I looooove the first twenty minutes of the film, but I really don't think there is an interesting enough plot with just the robots to drag out a 90+ minute film.

    Posted September 10th by Jet Presto

    Jet would you be offended if I talked about video game scores here as well?

    Posted September 10th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    No, absolutely go for it. I was planning to throw some out there, too. (Was meaning to after I mentioned Disasterpeace's score for It Follows and wanted to mention his score for Fez, but got a bit side tracked. This conversation seems like it will be exhausted pretty shortly. So the video game scores should breathe a new life.)




    Paying money for unsatisfactory work is not interesting to me.


    I don't need something to be "fulfilling" for the art to be satisfactory. I actually really liked Interstellar (this conversation reminds me of just how much I actually like it - you're going to hate it though). I didn't end up feeling "fulfillment," but I was satisfied with the direction the story went. I derive satisfaction from quality art, not an uplifting story. If I just watched a good movie, I feel satisfied, whether it's a family adventure film or a super heady indie think-film.


    Maybe you find great joy sitting through 3 hours of people being miserable and difficult, but that's not for me.


    There it is! Yep! That's exactly right. And that's fair! You don't like something being "miserable and difficult," and that's absolutely fair. (I feel that way about certain things, like Game of Thrones or the Walking Dead.) And I would not argue that I "find great joy" from watching 3 hours of "people being miserable and difficult." But I appreciate good filmmaking and good art, and art does not have to make me feel joyful. I don't *only* want Christopher Nolan films. But I appreciate quality films, and overall I think Nolan is a good director. Certainly, he's one of the more interesting directors that gets mainstream Hollywood play. But if a film is dark and dreary and bleak, and it challenged me in a way that made me self-reflect or actually use my brain to determine how I felt about the themes, then I appreciate it.

    I don't expect nor want films to leave me feeling the same way every time. I'm going to watch Miyazaki for the same reason I'm going to watch Christopher Nolan, nor do I watch Nolan for the same reason I watch Stanley Kubrick.

    Posted September 10th by Jet Presto

    Thanks. The main thing shutting me out of this thread was that it was about movie scores of the past decade and most of my memorable scores are from earlier than that in movies. But if it was games of the past decade there are many games I have to tip my hat to:

    Mass Effect 2 and 3 (ME1 would make the cut if it didn't come out in 2007)





    ^That one definitely has some Nolan feels to it. Dark Knight anyone?





    And even Mass Effect Andromeda managed to have one track I liked:



    It takes a while to build up but once it does it's an eargasm, especially with headphones on full blast. 1:20 is about where it should start I think tbh

    I will add more.









    Posted September 10th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    2:35 for the epic drop in the ME:A theme.

    Posted September 10th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Here is some of the OST from the web series RWBY as well which is really underrated:



    ^3:08 for part 2















    Posted September 10th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    One of the best video game soundtracks in recent memory actually comes from a free game:





    And interestingly, when the piano is either present or absent from the music it has a huge effect on what's going on.

    Posted September 11th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    I don't think we can have a discussion about modern film music and leave out Skyfall:





    Possible one of the greatest films of all time, which is impressive for such a beaten to death franchise.

    Posted September 11th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Can I just ask how you people remember all of this stuff? Often times I need something to remind me of music I really liked even if it was amazing to me. Which is why I'm not posting anything but would like to. Only a few random things come to mind for video game music at the moment.

    Edited September 12th by KnokkelMillennium

    Can I just ask how you people remember all of this stuff?

    I think people remember many things at different rates. A lot of people in here can remember music things. I am somewhat able to but I can remember other things pretty exact.

    Posted September 12th by Fox Forever

    Can I just ask how you people remember all of this stuff?


    Let me tell you a story.

    In 2010, my friend and I were randomly hanging out on a slow day at uni. We were driving around in his car, on our way to do something.

    I don't remember what day of the week it was, I don't remember the month, I don't remember what make of car he was driving, I don't remember what either of us were wearing and I don't remember what we were going to go do.

    What I do remember is when he filled in the silence by saying

    Drop it to the floor, make that ass shake
    Make the ground move, that's an ass quake
    Build a house up on that ass, that's an ass-state
    Roll my weed on it, that's an ass-tray


    In 2018, he put that track (Mercy by Kanye West) on the sound system at work. I immediately said "oh, this is that track you were quoting that one day we were driving around uni". He just looks at me.

    Moral of the story is that music sticks in my head for some reason.

    Edited September 12th by Cruinn-Annuin

    I wanted them to play brawl and guitar hero 3 music at my high achool’s Prom in 2008. I still can’t decide which one is better, but when I mentioned how I wanted Sakurai to import ghost hero 3 songs in brawl soursurfer responded and said “no, sakurai made a wonderful orchestra team here composing beautiful pieces art, not crummy old rock”.

    Posted September 12th by Weid man

    Which video game has the best Original Soundtrack?

    Edited September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Which video game has the best OST?


    It would essentially be cheating to say Guitar Hero 2/3, but they bear mentioning.

    Personally, my top three are Hotline Miami, Fallout: New Vegas and Metal Gear Solid V.

    Posted September 12th by Cruinn-Annuin

    Would Guitar Hero even be an OST? It isn't using an original sound track. It's using existing songs. It might have the best overall soundtrack. But not the best OST. I am going for video game music here Null.

    Edited September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Smash switch is gonna have 900+ songs but I won’t be able to listen to them because i’m Now totally deaf.

    Posted September 12th by Weid man

    Fallout: New Vegas

    Fallout's background music or the radio? Is it cheating to use a preexisting song? I get that you can't really judge GH in there because the music IS the game.

    Posted September 12th by Fox Forever

    Which video game has the best OST?


    That's a hard one for me too. Games came and went with so much variance and I liked quite a bit of the soundtracks for various reasons. But forget them much like I forget many of the games until reminded specifically. Though one game that is randomly coming to mind at the moment was metroid prime 2. I guess it's like... not particularly amazing but the music seemed great just because of how it blended so well with the atmosphere which was already pretty great. Another that comes to mind probably because it was my favorite game (if only due to nostalgia) is fire emblem radiant dawn. I'm probably biased because the game probably influenced how I view the music just a bit. Twilight princess also had some rather high moments but that may also partially be my bias since it's my favorite zelda.

    All of these answers seem nostalgia based unfortunately. And while I don't particularly like nostalgia dictating how good things can be seen, I can't deny it's influence either.

    Edited September 12th by KnokkelMillennium

    I would say that Smash has excellent original music but the nature of the game is kind of a mashup of many game universes so it's not exactly fair to include it. Games that I've listened to for their score:

    Resident Evil 5
    No More Heroes
    Heavy Rain
    Mario Sunshine
    Mario Galaxy
    Twilight Princess
    Wind Waker

    Twilight princess also had some rather high moments but that may also partially be my bias since it's my favorite zelda.

    Edit: Well it's not my favorite (that's Wind Waker) but I posted it too just 30 seconds after. TP's early trailer music also goes through my head a lot too. It sounds much darker than other Zelda games.


    Edited September 12th by Fox Forever

    Would Guitar Hero even be an OST? It isn't using an original sound track. It's using existing songs. It might have the best overall soundtrack. But not the best OST. I am going for video game music here Null.


    Fallout's background music or the radio? Is it cheating to use a preexisting song? I get that you can't really judge GH in there because the music IS the game.


    I don't make a distinction - I use the acronym "OST" to signify "official soundtrack", not "original soundtrack".

    If we're talking purely in terms of pieces of music created for the game, then Mega Man 2 is first, followed by Wolfenstein: The New Order, followed by Unreal Tournament 1999, then MGSV and Morrowind as honorable mentions.



    Edited September 12th by Cruinn-Annuin

    I use the acronym "OST" to signify "official soundtrack".

    I should have specified. I will go back and edit that post.

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    I don't want to mention many things like for example metal gear rising specifically because it feels silly for some reason but I did come back to it's soundtrack quite a bit too. But I also came back to a MGS vocal track recently.

    Edited September 12th by KnokkelMillennium

    Can I just ask how you people remember all of this stuff?


    I don't know an exact answer to this but music affects me quite powerfully on an emotional level so I suspect that causes me to attach to it more easily.

    Posted September 12th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    Here are my top 5 8-bit themes:









    My top 5 16-bit themes:



    ^Rev up that trumpet lol









    Top 5 N64 Tracks











    Honorable mention:



    Top 5 PS1 Era







    (And basically half the game's soundtrack too)



    Edited September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Best soundtracks by era:

    PC: Civilization III/Tiberian Sun
    NES: Ducktales
    Snes: Donkey Kong Country
    Sega: Sonic 1
    PS1: Final Fantasy VIII/Gran Turismo 1 - Tie
    N64: Goldeneye/Conker's Bad Fur Day - Tie
    PS2: Kingdom Hearts
    Gamecube: Super Smash Bros Melee
    Xbox: Halo 2
    Wii: Brawl
    Xbox 360: Halo 3
    PS3: The Last Of Us
    Gen 7 as a whole: Mass Effect 2


    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Sorry Brandy, I asked Jet's permission first.

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    You guys have to admit that yoshi’s island ds has the worst music of any kind. I was like, what the fuck is this shit that i’m listening to? The original yoshi’s island was a true masterpiece of music kind but yoshi’s Island ds songs were like a broken up synth (it was just one repetitive soft sound).

    The Zelda medleys are the best kind of orchestral music imo. Mario bros have good synth music and fire embolden is sort of like a mixture.

    Posted September 12th by Weid music

    The soundtrack for yoshi’s story is the only good thing about the game sadly. So there’s no reason to buy this practice mode based game. Just order the OST and upload it to iTunes.

    Posted September 12th by Weid man

    To be fair I have posted about movie, web series, and video game music and the only reason it SEEMS like it got hijacked is because not a lot of people are posting. If anything I breathed life into a thread that was already mostly dead.

    I considered making my own thread but I like comparing VG music to movie music.

    Edited September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    The soundtrack for yoshi’s story is the only good thing about the game sadly


    I... I liked that game back in the day. I'm really surprised that I liked it but you didn't. I mean I did wonder why I liked it but I did.

    Edited September 12th by KnokkelMillennium

    @IKM

    OMG yes, for me the G/S/C champion theme is the iconic pokemon battle music. I also think the R/B/Y champion theme is pretty cool. I know it's Jo Nathan's favourite champion theme.



    The version they did for Pokemon Origins was really cool too:



    I also liked the Sun/Moon theme that combined elements from both:



    Posted September 12th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    Did you know that you can home brew an ap called frets oh fire and it has some video game songs which you can play so it’s basically a guitar hero with video game and real lies music.

    Posted September 12th by Weid man

    I also really like gold and silver's Kanto gym leader theme (as well as it's many remixes)

    Blue's champion theme is amazing though.



    I could probably make my entire top 5 pokemon. XD







    Edited September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Is Blue's champion theme the same as the anime theme when Blaine's Magmar fights Charizard?

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Are you using the word XD as a laughter emoticon or are you referring to the actual Pokémon game XD gale of darkness which came out for the GameCube?

    Posted September 12th by Weid man

    Laughter.

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Pokemon XD and Colosseum actually have pretty good soundtracks too though.







    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Is Blue's champion theme the same as the anime theme when Blaine's Magmar fights Charizard?

    Yeah it's the same. I get super pumped when hearing the original of it. It actually made it seem even more difficult of a battle.


    Posted September 12th by Fox Forever

    Like Knuckles I can't tell if Pokémon Red/Blue legitimately has good music or if I'm just way too into the nostalgia of it.

    If you've ever played Dead Rising 2 it has some great mall music.













    It's kind of funny how well it works compared to the hundreds of thousands of zombies walking around.

    Edited September 12th by Fox Forever

    Is Blue's champion theme the same as the anime theme when Blaine's Magmar fights Charizard?


    Let me just find that scene on YouTube or something because I watched that like when it was on TV and never again so I don't remember...

    ... Update while looking... Too many people make fan videos with terrible music... Still looking for just the scene!

    No that sounds like the Pokemon Red/Blue gym theme to me. It's not a 100% like for like but it's the closest track I can associate it with.

    EDIT: Fox Forever seems to agree with you but, I dunno unless the one I found is using different music for some reason I don't hear the Champion Theme at all...

    Edited September 12th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    I think IKM means the part where Pikachu has his back to the lava. That's where it was.

    Edited September 12th by Fox Forever

    Red/Blue has good music for 8-bit.



    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    I think IKM means the part where Pikachu has his back to the lava. That's where it was.


    Will try to find that then...

    Posted September 12th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    I couldn't find the scene on YT but this is the music:



    Posted September 12th by Fox Forever

    I think the theme might have come up again in Ash vs Richie?

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Oh wow ok yea it is, that's a pretty cool version. The anime had some pretty cool versions of the tracks.

    I found just the music too:



    Posted September 12th by Moonray
    Moonray
     

    I think the theme might have come up again in Ash vs Richie?

    Gary I think.


    Posted September 12th by Fox Forever

    The original indigo league was really a musical marvel and quite an excellent series. It's a shame that subsequent series couldn't be as good. The pokemon movies 1 and 2 were fantastic.

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    I saw the indigo league complete dvd set and I almost picked it up just to have a piece of history.

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    I think the first movie was ok at the time but it hasn't aged greatly but I still liked the OST CD. 2000 was pretty cool and I think it still holds up. The music was also pretty good.



    Posted September 12th by Fox Forever

    Have you seen the pokemon abridged movie? Its based on the first movie and it's hilarious.





    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    I'll be sure to watch that soon. I've never seen it.

    Posted September 12th by Fox Forever

    The problem is that there were 3 parts and there were a lot of copyright problems so you'll be lucky to find all 3.

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    This is the official trailer for it though.



    I can't find any of the 3.

    Posted September 12th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Vacation’s where I need to be

    Buddy on the beach with oh and me

    We don’t need a holidaaay to stop and celbraaate

    Repeat after me I need a va-ca-toon

    Posted September 12th by Weid man

    Jet, I am still waiting on your to post your favorite VG tracks. :)

    Posted September 14th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king





    Edited September 14th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    SNES:



    N64:



    Gamecube



    Wii



    Wii U



    PC



    Bonus



    Edited September 14th by mariomguy

    Severnaya, yes!

    There are so many amazing tracks in that game. It doesn't matter how ugly it is or how shitty the controller is. It sounds beautiful.

    Posted September 14th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Goldeneye 007's music was amazing. Severnaya was a very dramatic track. I'd play that level over and over again just for the atmosphere and the music. Any other tracks I mentioned intrigued you?

    Posted September 14th by mariomguy

    Top 5 PS2 Era:













    Posted September 14th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    @mariomguy The SM64 water level does have very pretty music too. As does SM64 in general.

    Edited September 14th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Check the bonus song!

    Posted September 14th by mariomguy

    That's pretty dope actually.

    Posted September 14th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king





    Posted September 16th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Sorry! I keep meaning to post my favorites, but it's soooo hard to whittle it down to just a handful. I will post some soon!

    Posted September 16th by Jet Presto

    No worries Jet. You can post a few at a time as we discuss them if that helps.

    Posted September 17th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king



    Posted September 17th by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    One of my favorite soundtracks in gaming



    The music in this game reminds me of Bruce Faulconer's music in Dragonball Z American English dub.

    4:33 for where it starts to kick off.

    1:01:41 for my personal favorite track.

    Edited Sunday by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Pikkons theme

    Posted Sunday by Brandy



    Posted Sunday by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king

    Ok. There's just too many to whittle down! And my musical taste is sort of all over the place. A few that I just adore and often play at work:

    From Life is Strange, "Max and Chloe." Jonathan Morali's credits music perfectly captures the emotional feeling of the entire game, and I love it just so much.




    From Hotline Miami, "Hydrogen." M.O.O.N. has several of my favorite tracks on an already stellar soundtrack, and this one is like, the *perfect* track to set a pace when I run. It was my ringtone for a while, too. It's just so great. The music in this game goes a long way to my patience for dying in a brutally difficult and unforgiving game.




    From Katamari Damacy, "Gin & Tonic & Red Red Roses." Asuka Sakai's soundtrack is such a beautiful blend of different jazz eras mixed with sometimes very modern Japanese sounds. When it comes on over the stereo, some people do take notice to the foreign language vocals, but no one is ever like, "Is this video game music?" And not that I'm ashamed of my love of video game music, it feels a little gratifying to sneak it into the daily playlist without anyone noticing.

    [yotuube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_olRp55Zs0I


    From Undertale, "Undertale." Look, there's so much that I love about this game and its soundtrack. Toby Fox does an excellent job crafting a score that wonderfully captures the emotional beat of the game, or even emphasizing the humor. But for me, the main theme is just so beautiful to me, capturing a sense of melancholy while also feeling empowering, capturing that feeling of knowing you are love and supported.




    From Braid, "Downstream." Shira Kammen's score is somehow one of the most underappreciated elements of an otherwise well loved and acclaimed game. Not that anyone shits on the score or anything, but I just think it fits the game so well. Like Hotline Miami's soundtrack, it's relaxing melodies calm me when I am frustrated trying to figure out the puzzle. Reminds me that this should all be a calming experience, or almost meditative.




    From Furi, "My Only Chance." Look, I have some problems with the boss rush/bullet hell game that is Furi, but one thing it absolutely nails is the visual/audio aesthetic. I absolutely adore this soundtrack. This is another one of those soundtracks that works well for running (I suppose that's the benefit of an action-oriented game). It's great for my workouts, amps me up, and is something I can sneak in at work without anyone groaning about how all I ever play is video game music (which isn't even true, but I do play it a lot).





    Gonna stop there for now, but I do have some more tracks I know I want to talk briefly about.


    Posted Monday by Jet Presto

    Life is Strange had an amazing score all around. Listening to that theme again made me tear up and I am sitting at the gym right now. Lol People are wondering if I am gonna be ok. Been thinking of my brother a lot today and he loved that game.

    Posted Monday by I killed Mufasa
    I killed Mufasa
    long live the king
    Reply to: Scores and Soundtracks

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