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NVIDIA Reveals Old GPUs Can't Handle Raytracing, UE 4.22 Brings Raytracing to Devs, and more!
Posted: Posted April 14th, 2019 by mariomguy
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Raytracing is a massive revolution for gaming, and the revolution is upon us! Past techniques all required rasterization, basically a cheap method of snapping bitmap data from polygons, and screen space to render the final image. The methods all required workarounds because it was impossible to get all the data you needed per pixel. But that's exactly what raytracing does! Reflections and shadows can now be captured perfectly without any compromises!
https://www.engadget.com/2019/04/11/nvidia-shows-how-much-ray-tracing-sucks-on-older-gpus/
Unfortunately, the news that Pascal GPUs will include a patch to support raytracing also comes with the news that old GPUs basically cannot handle it, and the RTX 2060 trumps all of them by comparison, including the 1080ti and newest 1660 ti. So, the future can be yours for $350. If you spent any amount of money on anything else, don't bother.
https://www.unrealengine.com/en-US/blog/unreal-engine-4-22-released
In other news, Unreal Engine launched 4.22 with early support for raytracing! Current feature set includes raytraced shadows and reflections for static meshes and many objects, and in an experimental phase GI. Currently it's not in shippable condition (still no landscape support, or subsurface scattering), but it's good enough to experiment with, provided you have the right equipment.

The future sure looks bright. Games now have the same tech rendering them as CGI movies!

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Crytek actually showed a demo a month ago of Cryengine doing Real-Time Raytracing Reflections on non-nvidia hardware and they claim it runs on most mainstream graphics cards which most are taking to mean the GTX 10 series at the very least.



Doesn't include shadows which I know Nvidia's does but honestly I think most people are far more interested in the reflections than the shadows. We've already had shadows at a good point where they're convincing enough.


Edited April 14th, 2019 by Moonray
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Moonray
 

But flashy graphics aside I am pretty interested in seeing games with mechanics designed around raytracing show up. I could see a horror game designed around the use of mirrors to avoid some kind of monster/hunter working extremely well with it as you'd be able to see exactly what you should see.

Posted April 14th, 2019 by Moonray
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Moonray
 

Actually, no, shadows nowadays are explicitly horrible. You either have baked shadows (low quality, horrific bake times, static), cascaded shadow maps (capture the scene several times over, still blurry, more expensive than necessary), or distance field shadows (semi-static, large memory input, unsupported on large terrains where it'd be most useful). Raytraced shadows take care of everything per-pixel for stunning quality, support fully dynamic environments, and don't require rerenders of the same scene multiple times.

If we can get to the point where raytracing can take care of shadows, reflections, AND GI, there will be nothing stopping dynamic games from being properly lit, shaded, or reflected. As of right now, fully dynamic environments are kind of impossible to work with. Even static environments with plenty of foliage are difficult to get shadowed right.

Cryengine devs make plenty of boastful comments. Even if raytraced reflections do work, the lack of shadows wouldn't be OK in most game environments.

Posted April 14th, 2019 by mariomguy
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What are you defining as a "dynamic" environment?


Posted April 14th, 2019 by Moonray
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Moonray
 

Changing time of day, moving lights. You can't bake in something that's moving, so all the lighting calculations need to be handled dynamically. At the moment, doing this for large open worlds is very difficult. There are cons to all present solutions. With raytracing there are no cons, other than hardware support, which will soon vanish.

Posted April 14th, 2019 by mariomguy
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"So, the future can be yours for $350"

I'm not sure where you are seeing that price, but NVIDIA has it listed for $1200+ on their website.
https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/shop/geforce/?page=1&limit=9&locale=en-us&gpu=RTX%%202080%%20Ti

Edited April 15th, 2019 by Q
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Q
 

He probably just looked at the cheapest off-brand version on amazon and cited that.

Edited April 15th, 2019 by Cruinn-Annuin
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I believe he was referring to the RTX2060 which is around the price (at least in the UK). He does mention the 2060 right before the price so...

Posted April 15th, 2019 by Moonray
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Moonray
 

"I believe he was referring to the RTX2060 which is around the price (at least in the UK). He does mention the 2060 right before the price so..."

True, he does. Sorry, that was my bad, I read it as 2080. You can indeed get a 2060 for $350 on newegg.com
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500458&ignorebbr=1&source=region&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleAdwords-PC&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleAdwords-PC-_-pla-_-Video+Card+-+Nvidia-_-N82E16814500458&gclid=Cj0KCQjw19DlBRCSARIsAOnfReiYlNks7A23cU5i4Z7t69Yle-HJawhDPYPKPOGKvv1UBnhfiu5vqDMaAogtEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Posted April 15th, 2019 by Q
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Q
 

Here is an NVIDIA's VP of Technical Marketing discussing raytracing in a quick 5-minute video, including how it works and why it runs so much faster on the RTX cards.
https://youtu.be/476N4KX8shA
While he didn't have enough time to explain in the video, dynamic GI is the problem of our times. In order to make a game that doesn't require any baking at all, indirect light (the light that fills the shadows of the world and illuminates interior spaces) would have to be calculated in realtime. In the past, games like The Sims drop the ball on lighting and don't even make an attempt to portray it accurately: the light is plain, flat, and simple. In the real world light bounces: a small patch of sunlight will hit a red cloth and cast red light all over. Then it will bounce off of white walls and extend further.

Along with many of the other effects he mentioned, raytracing is the only way to calculate GI properly. Cast a ray from the camera at the pixel and figure out how much light it captures. Up until now we haven't been doing that!

I am excited to see where this goes! I'm pumped up and almost getting ready to upgrade my GPU... almost.

Edited April 16th, 2019 by mariomguy
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