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Haruki Murakami
Posted: Posted August 21st by Post-Wall Olga
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Anyone read his books? I got into him last year. His story story collection, Men Without Women, is amazing, has alot of amazing quotes, it's dripping with red pills.

This may sound weird, but his words rescued from the state of hopelessness I was in. Once I got home from work, I knew I had my Haruki Murakami book to look forward to. Reading his books is always so intoxicating - I enjoy the way he can turn the mundane into the extraordinary.

The female of the species is deadlier than the male. -Rudyard Kipling
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I haven't read "Men without women" but it is on my kindle.

Posted August 21st by S.o.h.
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S.o.h.
 

Ohh, read An Independent Organ when you do get around to reading Men Without Women.

Posted August 21st by Jubei
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Jubei
This path is one that I have chosen myself

enjoyed another short story collection of his called The Elephant Vanishes

Posted August 21st by Pirate_Ninja
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Hah, I have that book too. I have Men Without Women, The Elephant Vanishes, and After Dark. But so far I've only read Men Without Women. I'll read the other books soon and get some more of his books once I finish these two.

I just admire the authenticity in his writing. It would be so refreshing if we could talk to others the way people talk in his world. I like how honest the characters are about their feelings and their thought processes. His characters are so distinct, so flawed, so human.



Posted August 21st by Post-Wall Olga
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I've read The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Kafka on the Shore, and some of The Elephant Vanishes. I think The-Wind Up Bird Chronicle is a fair representation of his style/work. I love it; would recommend. It really fleshes out themes of isolation/alienation and power/weakness/strangeness in the context of humanity/desire/intimacy. Would say though that I can see it being more popular among men, particularly reactionary and aimless men (things happen to them -- not to open up a can of worms with you in particular, Jubei). I agree; it's very authentic. Feels natural, believable, very Japanese. I'd like to check out Men without Women when there's time.

Posted August 21st by Ophelia
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Haven't read that one, but I'll read it as soon as I finish the other two. I really like his style. Between him and Shiga Naoya, I've discovered two very red pill fiction writers. This quote from Men Without Women really stands out: It’s quite easy to become Men Without Women. You love a woman deeply, and then she goes off somewhere. That’s all it takes.

From the description The Wind up Bird Chronicle sounds like another good source of red pill knowledge, so very eager to read it.

As a male, I'm extremely good at finding meaning in everything. I reflect on the current state of affairs, status quote, and I use observations that I'm exposed to (in media, books, music, art, movies) in order to interpret those feelings. It was moreso true when I was a teenager; when I still had a sense of some magical connection which was amazing and I long for the days I could feel it so intently.

With Murakami, I feel so understood, so vindicated. It's the validation I get that keeps me hook, but also his upfront, matter of fact writing style that I can't get enough of. It's like he has a way of making you feel what the characters feel; when they laugh I laugh, when they're down, I'm down.

Murakami's writing, at least short stories, have so much replay value - It's like, there's a magical hold where I want to re-read his stories all over again.

Posted August 22nd by Post-Wall Olga
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I agree; it's very authentic. Feels natural, believable, very Japanese. I'd like to check out Men without Women when there's time.

Yes, very Japanese is right. It's weird, I read somewhere that in Japan he's disliked for being too western, whatever that means. Imo, his writing has a lot more in common with other Japanese writers than, say Stephen King or any other American authors. I see striking similar things between him and Shiga Naoya, and I'm pretty sure once I read other Japanese writers I'll see how they've influenced him and other similarities he shares with them.

Such criticism is dumb anyways. The way I see it, good music is good, regardless of how different it is. Good writing is good writing. He writes very well. I want to read more of his work now.

Posted August 22nd by Jubei
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Jubei
This path is one that I have chosen myself

Yes. His novels and short stories make great toilet paper. Each page perfectly collects every piece of fecal matter with ease.

Posted October 26th by Freeman’s crowbar
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Loving After Dark. I think it's his most underrated work. It evokes the right feelings, it's the right size, but it's so overlooked. After I've read all of his writings, it may not be my favorite but it's an absolute gem.

I'm going to start Colorless soon.

Posted November 6th by Post-Wall Olga
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I also read The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. Great, dream-like story. It's a little bit too unreal for me, though.

If you like HM, I definitely recommend everyone watch Burning, a movie on Netflix that's based on one of his short stories. It takes place in Seoul and is similarly ambiguous, but still real and emotional and impacting.

Posted November 6th by Agis
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Agis
 
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