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09/11/2001 WE REMEMBER

"Fear is the foundation of most governments." - John Adams

"My family is more important than my party." - Zell Miller

Corporate Joe Crowley primaried by Democratic Socialist
Posted: Posted June 27th by pacman

https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/26/politics/alexandria-ocasio-cortez-joe-crowley-new-york-14-primary/index.htm
With no corporate money. And he was in office for nearly two decades.

Needless to say, am excited af.

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There are 15 Replies

Well, I first heard of Ms. Ocasio-Cortez about five minutes ago so I hesitate to say very much. Given the district she's in I assume that a November victory is a foregone conclusion.

Have the socialists successfully primaried any other Democrat incumbents yet?

Posted June 27th by Famov
Famov

28 and still paying off student loans. Sounds good to me.

Posted June 27th by Agis
Agis
 

Well read more about her after work.

Also

Debt Free Since 93 baby!!!

Posted June 27th by S.o.h.
S.o.h.
 

Here's a good NYT article about her and the campaign.

Representative Joseph Crowley of New York, once seen as a possible successor to Nancy Pelosi as Democratic leader of the House, suffered a shocking primary defeat on Tuesday, the most significant loss for a Democratic incumbent in more than a decade, and one that will reverberate across the party and the country.

Mr. Crowley was defeated by a 28-year-old political newcomer, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a former organizer for Bernie Sanders’s presidential campaign, who had declared it was time for generational, racial and ideological change.

The last time Mr. Crowley, 56, even had a primary challenger, in 2004, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez was not old enough to vote.

Mr. Crowley, the No. 4 Democrat in the House, had drastically outspent his lesser-known rival to no avail, as Ms. Ocasio-Cortez’s campaign was lifted by an aggressive social media presence and fueled by attention from national progressives hoping to flex their muscle in a race against a potential future speaker.

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez had used Mr. Crowley’s role in the leadership, and the fact that he was the head of the local Democratic Party machine, against him in her bid to upend the existing political class. She will face Anthony Pappas, the Republican candidate, in the November general election.

Mr. Crowley is the first House Democrat in the nation to lose a primary in 2018. His loss is most significant for a congressional incumbent since Eric Cantor, then the No. 2 Republican in the House, was defeated in 2014 to a Tea Party activist, David Brat.

Like that contest, the Crowley defeat is expected to shake up Congress, where Mr. Crowley was seen as a top contender to replace Ms. Pelosi, if she stepped aside after the midterms.

The race was not close. Ms. Ocasio-Cortez had more than 57 percent of the vote, with almost all precincts reporting.

“It’s surreal,” Ms. Ocasio-Cortez said in a live television interview as the votes were being tallied.

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By then, no television showed results at what was supposed to have been Mr. Crowley’s victory party.

Mr. Crowley appeared rattled when he spoke. “I know you’re all trying your best to make me cry, but it’s not going to happen,” he told supporters.

The guitar-strumming incumbent later played Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run,” and dedicated it to Ms. Ocasio-Cortez.

Now @JoeCrowleyNY is playing guitar. He dedicated the first song to @Ocasio2018 — “Born to Run”
@ pic.twitter.com/U3sx6mth90
— J. David Goodman (@jdavidgoodman) June 27, 2018

Representative Joseph Crowley of New York during a news conference on Capitol Hill this month. Mr. Crowley lost the Democratic primary to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, 28, a political newcomer from the Bronx who worked as an organizer for Bernie Sanders’s presidential campaign.CreditAl Drago for The New York Times

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez is a native of the Bronx and a Latina in a Queens and Bronx district that is majority-minority, a fact she emphasized repeatedly on the trail against Mr. Crowley, who is white. In hindsight, the seat represented perhaps a perfect brew for an upset: a rusty incumbent, a charismatic challenger and a liberal district that gave Mr. Sanders more than 41 percent of the vote against Hillary Clinton.

“Women like me aren’t supposed to run for office,” Ms. Ocasio-Cortez said at the start of a biographical video that went viral last month and was viewed more than half-a-million times.

She ran as a woman, as a young person, as a working-class champion, as an unabashed liberal and as a person of color. She piled up endorsements from national progressive groups in recent weeks and from Cynthia Nixon, who is running her own insurgent bid for governor against Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo. Ms. Nixon attended the Ocasio-Cortez victory party.

“What I see is that the Democratic Party takes working class communities for granted, they take people of color for granted and they just assume that we’re going to turn out no matter how bland or half-stepping these proposals are,” Ms. Ocasio-Cortez said in a recent interview about why she was running.

A member of the Democratic Socialists of America, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez gathered endorsements from liberal groups like MoveOn, Democracy for America and People for Bernie. The news site The Intercept had urged her on, publishing a drumbeat of negative stories about Mr. Crowley, and glowing stories about her, in the campaign’s closing weeks.

President Trump, who like Mr. Crowley is from Queens, waded in on Twitter. “That is a big one that nobody saw happening,” Mr. Trump wrote. “Perhaps he should have been nicer, and more respectful, to his President!”

Wow! Big Trump Hater Congressman Joe Crowley, who many expected was going to take Nancy Pelosi’s place, just LOST his primary election. In other words, he’s out! That is a big one that nobody saw happening. Perhaps he should have been nicer, and more respectful, to his President!
— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 27, 2018

Days before the election, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez had unexpectedly left New York entirely to travel to Texas to protest the ongoing separation of children from their parents who crossed the border illegally.

That came on the heels of her call to abolish the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. Mr. Crowley heated up his own rhetoric in response to her challenge, calling it a “fascist organization,” but stopped short of saying it should be dissolved.

Ten days before the primary, Mr. Crowley skipped a debate against Ms. Ocasio-Cortez, and instead sent a surrogate, a Latina former city councilwoman. Ms. Ocasio-Cortez called it “a bizarre twist” on Twitter to be seated across from someone “with slight resemblance to me” instead of her opponent.

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez used the moment to generate a fresh wave of publicity in the race’s crucial closing days.

Waging a sharp and sometimes personal campaign, she attacked Mr. Crowley for not living in New York and, specifically, sending his children to school near Washington. When there was tear gas released on protesters in Puerto Rico, she tagged Mr. Crowley on Twitter and wrote, “You are responsible for this.” And when he asked her at a debate if she would endorse him, if he prevailed, she pointedly refused.

Mr. Crowley was not caught totally off guard. He had campaigned aggressively in the last six weeks, pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into television ads and mailers, often highlighting his opposition to Mr. Trump.

But in an indication of how disparate the two camps were and how much of an outsider Ms. Ocasio-Cortez was, Mr. Crowley said that, as of 11 p.m., they had yet to speak. He did not have her number and he did not believe she had his.

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez’s triumph echoed some of the past upsets in New York City races that turned on a yearning for generational or racial change.

In 1992, for example, Nydia Velázquez, then 39, became the first Hispanic woman to represent New York City when she defeated a veteran congressman in a newly drawn district that was filled with Puerto Rican voters.

And two decades earlier, Elizabeth Holtzman, then only 31, unseated 84-year-old Representative Emanuel Celler, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, who had come to Congress during the Harding administration.

Mr. Crowley’s loss left Democrats in Washington stunned. In recent months, he had begun meeting with lawmakers in small groups in a quiet effort to prepare for a bid for the speakership.

His departure leaves a gaping vacuum in the House, where he is the top-ranked Democrat under the age of 70.

“Hi Nance,” Mr. Crowley greeted Ms. Pelosi when she called him shortly after his defeat. He later told reporters, “She called me to tell me how much she loves me.”

Representative Steny Hoyer, a longtime rival of Ms. Pelosi’s, now is freed from having to worry about Mr. Crowley in his ambition to be leader. But some House Democrats, speaking anonymously to discuss a delicate topic, said Tuesday night that given the party’s changing face, it would be difficult to dump Ms. Pelosi for an older, white male lawmaker.

In a flurry of phone calls and text messages, Democratic lawmakers floated names such as Cheri Bustos of Illinois, Linda Sanchez of California, Joseph Kennedy of Massachusetts and Seth Moulton of Massachusetts as potential younger alternatives to Ms. Pelosi. But Ms. Pelosi has made clear she intends to seek the post again if Democrats take back the House and it is not clear that any potential alternative candidate could build a coalition to defeat her.

As for Ms. Ocasio-Cortez, she had complained in recent weeks about media coverage that didn’t include her name but only that of the better-known man she was running against.

“Headlines from the Political Patriarchy,” she wrote on Twitter of one recent story.

Now, she is likely to be in headlines for years to come.

Edited June 27th by Agis
Agis
 

Good riddance to the corporate Democrat. Too many old white men in power anyways. The Communist Revolution is coming!!

Posted June 27th by Jubei
Jubei
 

Also, Crowley is probably so pissed at Ro Khanna right now, for merely mentioning Ocasio-Cortez’s name in public lol. Wouldn’t be surprised if the Democratic party machine finds a way to punish Ro somehow.

Have the socialists successfully primaried any other Democrat incumbents yet?

Not any big ones, no (I’m still heartbroken over Paula Jean losing to Manchin). There has definitely been a decent progressive wave in really small, virtually unknown local elections throughout the country. Especially with progressive women running, I’ve noticed.

28 and still paying off student loans. Sounds good to me.

It’s almost as though an entire generation or more got systematically screwed over by student loan debt.

Nice classism tho

Edited June 27th by pacman
pacman
 

I wasn't being sarcastic. That's basically me.

Posted June 27th by Agis
Agis
 

My bad Agis, sorry about that snip. Your post seriously sounded like sarcasm to me lol.

Posted June 27th by pacman
pacman
 

I am lucky enough not to have any debt simply because I didn’t go to college. It’s just really shitty and depressing seeing people who DID put in the time, work and personal expense working worse jobs than me due to debt and a shitty job market. I remember, a top reason I didn’t go to college right after high school is because I didn’t want to accumulate debt, and the adults around me said that was silly because it’s an investment and a career would pay off the debt in no time, etc. :/

Posted June 27th by pacman
pacman
 

This was a hispaniclash!!!!!

Posted June 27th by #85
#85

Damn right it was a Hispaniclash.

Say it with me: Alexandria Ocasio-Cooooooortez 2018!

Posted June 27th by pacman
pacman
 

This is pretty rad, but I'm a bit more skeptical of what it represents overall. Her platform is pretty solid and easily favorable to a wide audience, but I'm a bit hesitant to jump on board the "this is where the party needs to move en masse to win national elections" train yet. (Not that I don't think that's where the party *should* go. Just not sure how that plays everywhere.)

I think the thing here though is this: a lot of the further left Democrats running lately have a thing that stands out: genuine principles and ideals. You can hate these people all you want (and I suspect conservatives will make no effort to bother engaging in good faith conversation with them), but these are people coming from an actual place of principle. THAT seems to play pretty well itself, seemingly far more than the more measured and diplomatic centrist Democrats (who have long bent to the will of Republican voters.)

Posted June 27th by Jet Presto
Jet Presto

Any marxist agenda she tries to push will be shot down by Trump's Supreme Court.

Posted June 28th by #85
#85

This is pretty rad, but I'm a bit more skeptical of what it represents overall. Her platform is pretty solid and easily favorable to a wide audience, but I'm a bit hesitant to jump on board the "this is where the party needs to move en masse to win national elections" train yet. (Not that I don't think that's where the party *should* go. Just not sure how that plays everywhere.)

Unfortunately I can’t disagree, especially after the disappointing WV Dem primary. Ultimately though, I think this is indicative of a long term shift to the left within the American overton window. Even more so than the strategy not working out in all 50 states, I worry about obstruction from the Democratic party machine, as they have influence not only in politics but in the media as well. The Pelosi/Schumer crowd will fight this grassroots wave tooth and nail, possibly harder than the Repubs. They will also attempt to swallow the movement whole and turn it into something divisive and bigoted the way Fox News and the Republican machine did with the various libertarian/civil liberties protests that eventually became the fucked up Tea Party/Birther movement. Let’s not be so cocky as to believe leftists aren’t susceptible to the same divide and conquer tactics.

Edited July 3rd by pacman
pacman
 

I think the thing here though is this: a lot of the further left Democrats running lately have a thing that stands out: genuine principles and ideals. You can hate these people all you want (and I suspect conservatives will make no effort to bother engaging in good faith conversation with them), but these are people coming from an actual place of principle. THAT seems to play pretty well itself, seemingly far more than the more measured and diplomatic centrist Democrats (who have long bent to the will of Republican voters.)

See, as much as I disagree with many of their ideas, I respect the Ron Paul crowd for this very reason - principle. Not only that, but they actually agree with the so-called “radical” left on a number of vital issues- imperialism, war, civil liberties, the police state, etc. I wish libertarians and socialists could let go of their precious economic ideologies just long enough to fix these things. Then they can go back to fighting over taxes or whatever.


Posted June 29th by pacman
pacman
 
Reply to: Corporate Joe Crowley primaried by Democratic Socialist

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